PCT Revolution™

  • PCT_IMG

PCT Revolution™

$79.99

Out of stock

ADVANCED POST-CYCLE THERAPY

When your body produces abnormally high levels of testosterone for an extensive period of time you need to get your system back firing on all cylinders. Post-Cycle Therapy does just that. Some of the most researched and developed hormone regulation ingredients are included in PCT Revolution; the most effective, clinically dosed PCT supplement in production today.

  • Tribulus Terrestris – Elevates luteinizing hormone, which in turn sends instructions to the testes causing them to make testosterone.
  • Acacetin – An aromatase inhibitor that reduces that amount of testosterone that gets converted to estrogen.
  • DIM – Has potent effects on estrogen metabolism and is able to keep the body relatively balanced by preventing either drastic increases or decreases in estrogen.
  • Urtica Dioica – Binds with very high affinity to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). It’s hypothesized that by binding to SHBG, Urtica will increase the concentration of free testosterone.
(*To view complete supplement facts click on the ingredient profile tab below)

PCT Revolution will help keep your estrogen levels in check and normalized. At the same time it will stimulate the production of natural testosterone, which may have been suppressed during times of highly elevated testosterone production.

If you are in need of a reliable PCT supplement – PCT Revolution is the perfect addition to your supplement regime.

 

Compare
SKU: 9312- PCT Revolution 120 Capsules. Category: .

PCT

ULTIMATE PCT MATRIX

 

Tribulus Terrestris:

Tribulus is an herb that is mostly recommended for male health including virility and vitality, and specifically more catered towards cardiovascular and urogenital health.

  • It is a common supplement for its libido enhancing properties and testosterone boosting properties.
  • The theory behind tribulus is it elevates luteinizing hormone, which in turn sends instructions to the testes causing them to make testosterone.
  • Sellandi et al. (2012) found in men supplementing with tribulus for 60 days were able to increase testosterone by 16.3%.

Cissus Quadrangularis:

Cissus quadrangularis is a traditional medicine for joint and bone health, and shows promise in promoting bone growth rates.

  • Due to the ability of cissus quadrangularis to act as a glucocorticoid antagonist, it has been proposed to possess anabolic/androgenic activity.
  • It also appears to be  very effective pain killer and possible fat loss agent.
  • In a pilot study assessing the effects of cissus quadrangularis on joint pain in otherwise healthy men who had pain due to excessive exercise, cissus daily for eight weeks was able to reduce joint pain by 31% relative to baseline.

Urtica Dioica:

Divanil (aka 3,4-divanillyltetrahydrofuran, DVTHF) is an extract from the stinging nettle root (Urtica dioica). DVTHF exerts its effects by acting on testosterone transport proteins.

  • Testosterone in the human body exists either in a free circulating form or in inactive form bound to transport proteins. The transport proteins to which testosterone binds are albumin and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG).
  • DVTHF binds with very high affinity to SHBG. It’s hypothesized that by binding to SHBG, DVTHF will increase the concentration of free testosterone.

Bulbine Natalensis:

Bulbine Natalensis is a traditionally used aphrodisiac and testosterone Booster in South and South-Eastern Africa

  • Mechanistically, supplementation with Bulbine Natalensis is associated with an increase in the activities of alkaline and acid phosphatases. The activity of the phosphatase enzymes correlates somewhat with increases in testicular and serum testosterone.
  • Three separate rat studies looking at serum testosterone levels noted significant increases in circulating testosterone, and one study noted a decrease in estrogen levels as well.

Acacetin:

Acacetin is a natural flavone that is found in the Damiana (Turnera diffusa) plant. Acacetin has been studied for a variety of reasons and some research suggests it may help support a healthy estrogen to testosterone balance.

  • Research suggests that Acacetin may support a healthy aromatase balance. Aromatase is the enzyme responsible for converting testosterone to estrogen.
  • Inhibition of the aromatase enzyme helps reduce the amount of testosterone that gets converted to estrogen.
  • Healthy regulation of the aromatase enzyme can help support healthy testosterone and estrogen levels.
  • Researchers at the University of Mississippi studied the anti-aromatase and estrogenic activity of 24 different compounds isolated from the damiana plant. Among the 24 tested compounds, acacetin showed the most potent aromatase inhibition. In fact, acacetin suppressed up to 63 percent of aromatase activity. The researchers concluded that acacetin could significantly suppress aromatase activity and was the only compound found to have potent anti-aromatase activity and absolutely no estrogenic effects.

DIM (Dinndolylmethane):

DIM is a molecule that consists of two indole groups attached to a methane group.  It is commonly found in broccoli and hold promise as an aromatase inhibitor.

  • DIM has potent effects on estrogen metabolism and is able to keep the body relatively balanced by preventing either drastic increases or decreases in estrogen.
  • DIM can both inhibit the aromatase enzyme (and prevent conversion of testosterone into estrogen) and it can act on more potent forms of estrogen and convert them into less potent forms; this conversion reduces the overall effects of estrogen in the body.

Zinc Aspartate:

Zinc is vital for several important physiological roles in the body and is needed for many enzymatic reactions including those necessary to stimulate muscle protein synthesis.

  • Zinc deficiency has been linked to low IGF-1 Levels and Growth Hormone.
  • Zinc also supports optimal testosterone levels and may increase testosterone at rest and after exercise.
  • A 2006 study by Killic et al. found wrestlers who supplemented with Zinc for 4 weeks were able preserve circulating testosterone and thyroid hormone concentrations, which declined in placebo due to the exhaustive workload.

Magnesium Aspartate:

Magnesium is an essential mineral and electrolyte. It is involved in protein synthesis, ATP formation, metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, and bone strength.

  • Magnesium deficiencies are the second most common deficiency in developed countries. A lack of magnesium will raise blood pressure and reduce insulin sensitivity.
  • Increases in free and total testosterone have been noted in sedentary and athletic populations when supplementing with magnesium supplementation. It also acts as a muscle relaxer and may improve aerobic performance.
  • Brilla et al. (1992) discovered 26 untrained subjects who participated in a 7 week strength training program in conjunction with magnesium supplementation were able to increase testosterone relative to baseline.

Pine Bark Extract:

Pine bark extract may increase blood flow, specifically in regards to NO increase, and improving blood glucose control. It also works as an excellent antioxidant.

  • Liu et al. (2004) discovered pycnogenol daily for 8 weeks was associated with improved blood flow and trended towards higher NO levels in serum.

Q: What is the best way to take PCT Revolution?
A: Take One Serving (4 Capsules) just before you go to sleep. For optimal performance, repeat use for 4-6 weeks continuously.

Q: What is a aromatase inhibitor and why is it important?
A: Aromatase is the enzyme responsible for converting testosterone to estrogen. Inhibition of the aromatase enzyme helps reduce the amount of testosterone that gets converted to estrogen. Certain ingredients found in PCT Revolution act as aromatase inhibitors.

Q: What other MuscleSport products do you recommend stacking with PCT Revolution?
A: We recommend stacking PCT Revolution with either Test Revolution or Andro Revolution.

Tribulus:
1. Brown, G. A., Vukovich, M. D., Sharp, R. L., Reifenrath, T. A., Parsons, K. A., & King, D. S. (1999). Effect of oral DHEA on serum testosterone and adaptations to resistance training in young men. Journal of Applied Physiology, 87(6), 2274-2283.
2. Brown, G. A., Vukovich, M. D., Martini, E. R., Kohut, M. L., Franke, W. D., Jackson, D. A., & King, D. S. (2001). Effects of androstenedione-herbal supplementation on serum sex hormone concentrations in 30-to 59-year-old men. International journal for vitamin and nutrition research, 71(5), 293-301.
3. Brown, G. A., Vukovich, M. D., Martini, E. R., Kohut, M. L., Franke, W. D., Jackson, D. A., & King, D. S. (2001). Endocrine and lipid responses to chronic androstenediol-herbal supplementation in 30 to 58 year old men.Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 20(5), 520-528.
4. Sellandi, T. M., Thakar, A. B., & Baghel, M. S. (2012). Clinical study of Tribulus terrestris Linn. in Oligozoospermia: A double blind study. Ayu, 33(3), 356.
5. Dimitrov, M., Georgiev, P., & Vitanov, S. (1986). [Use of tribestan on rams with sexual disorders]. Veterinarno-meditsinski nauki, 24(5), 102-110.

Cissus Quadrangularis:
1. Chopra, S. S., Patel, M. R., & Awadhiya, R. P. (1976). Studies of Cissus quadrangularis in experimental fracture repair: a histopathological study. The Indian journal of medical research, 64(9), 1365.

Divanil:
1. Schöttner, M., Ganßer, D., & Spiteller, G. (1997). Lignans from the roots of Urtica dioica and their metabolites bind to human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Planta medica, 63(6), 529-532.
2. Hryb, D. J., Khan, M. S., Romas, N. A., & Rosner, W. (1995). The effect of extracts of the roots of the stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) on the interaction of SHBG with its receptor on human prostatic membranes. Planta medica,61(1), 31-32.
3. Hirano, T., Homma, M., & Oka, K. (1994). Effects of stinging nettle root extracts and their steroidal components on the Na+, K (+)-ATPase of the benign prostatic hyperplasia. Planta medica, 60(1), 30-33.

Bulbine Natelesnis:
1. Yakubu, M. T., & Afolayan, A. J. (2010). Anabolic and androgenic activities of Bulbine natalensis stem in male Wistar rats. Pharmaceutical biology,48(5), 568-576.
2. Yakubu, M. T., & Afolayan, A. J. (2009). Effect of aqueous extract of Bulbine natalensis (Baker) stem on the sexual behaviour of male rats. International journal of andrology, 32(6), 629-636.

Acacetin:
1. Zhao, J., Dasmahapatra, A. K., Khan, S. I., & Khan, I. A. (2008). Anti-aromatase activity of the constituents from damiana (Turnera diffusa).Journal of ethnopharmacology, 120(3), 387-393.

DIM:
1. Lo, R., & Matthews, J. (2010). A New Class of Estrogen Receptor Beta–Selective Activators. Molecular interventions, 10(3), 133.
2. Leong, H., Riby, J. E., Firestone, G. L., & Bjeldanes, L. F. (2004). Potent ligand-independent estrogen receptor activation by 3, 3′-diindolylmethane is mediated by cross talk between the protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Molecular Endocrinology, 18(2), 291-302.
3. Leong, H., Firestone, G. L., & Bjeldanes, L. F. (2001). Cytostatic effects of 3, 3′-diindolylmethane in human endometrial cancer cells result from an estrogen receptor-mediated increase in transforming growth factor-α expression. Carcinogenesis, 22(11), 1809-1817.
4. Sanderson, J. T., Slobbe, L., Lansbergen, G. W., Safe, S., & Van den Berg, M. (2001). 2, 3, 7, 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and diindolylmethanes differentially induce cytochrome P450 1A1, 1B1, and 19 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Toxicological sciences, 61(1), 40-48.
5. Safe, S., Wang, F., Porter, W., Duan, R., & McDougal, A. (1998). Ah receptor agonists as endocrine disruptors: antiestrogenic activity and mechanisms. Toxicology letters, 102, 343-347.

Zinc:
1. Brilla, L. R., & Conte, V. (2000). Effects of a novel zinc-magnesium formulation on hormones and strength. J Exerc Physiol Online, 3(4), 26-36.
2. Kilic, M., Baltaci, A. K., Gunay, M., Gökbel, H., Okudan, N., & Cicioglu, I. (2005). The effect of exhaustion exercise on thyroid hormones and testosterone levels of elite athletes receiving oral zinc. Neuro endocrinology letters, 27(1-2), 247-252.
3. Kilic, M. (2007). Effect of fatiguing bicycle exercise on thyroid hormone and testosterone levels in sedentary males supplemented with oral zinc. Neuro endocrinology letters, 28(5), 681-685.
4. Jalali, G. R., Roozbeh, J., Mohammadzadeh, A., Sharifian, M., Sagheb, M. M., Jahromi, A. H., … & Afshariani, R. (2010). Impact of oral zinc therapy on the level of sex hormones in male patients on hemodialysis. Renal failure,32(4), 417-419.
5. Netter, A., Nahoul, K., & Hartoma, R. (1981). Effect of zinc administration on plasma testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and sperm count. Archives of andrology, 7(1), 69-73.
6. Tupe, R. P., & Chiplonkar, S. A. (2009). Zinc supplementation improved cognitive performance and taste acuity in Indian adolescent girls. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 28(4), 388-396.
7. Prasad, A. S., Beck, F. W., Bao, B., Fitzgerald, J. T., Snell, D. C., Steinberg, J. D., & Cardozo, L. J. (2007). Zinc supplementation decreases incidence of infections in the elderly: effect of zinc on generation of cytokines and oxidative stress. The American journal of clinical nutrition,85(3), 837-844.

Magnesium:
1. Cinar, V., Polat, Y., Baltaci, A. K., & Mogulkoc, R. (2011). Effects of magnesium supplementation on testosterone levels of athletes and sedentary subjects at rest and after exhaustion. Biological trace element research, 140(1), 18-23.
2. van der Plas, A. A., Schilder, J. C., Marinus, J., & van Hilten, J. J. (2013). An explanatory study evaluating the muscle relaxant effects of intramuscular magnesium sulphate for dystonia in complex regional pain syndrome. The Journal of Pain, 14(11), 1341-1348.
3. Hatzistavri, L. S., Sarafidis, P. A., Georgianos, P. I., Tziolas, I. M., Aroditis, C. P., Zebekakis, P. E., … & Lasaridis, A. N. (2009). Oral magnesium supplementation reduces ambulatory blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. American journal of hypertension, 22(10), 1070-1075.
4. Golf, S. W., Bender, S., & Grüttner, J. (1998). On the significance of magnesium in extreme physical stress. Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy,12(2), 197-202.
5. Carpenter, T. O., DeLucia, M. C., Zhang, J. H., Bejnerowicz, G., Tartamella, L., Dziura, J., … & Cohen, D. (2006). A randomized controlled study of effects of dietary magnesium oxide supplementation on bone mineral content in healthy girls. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 91(12), 4866-4872.
6. Held, K., Antonijevic, I. A., Künzel, H., Uhr, M., Wetter, T. C., Golly, I. C., … & Murck, H. (2002). Oral Mg (2+) supplementation reverses age-related neuroendocrine and sleep EEG changes in humans. Pharmacopsychiatry,35(4), 135-143.
7. Brilla, L. R., & Haley, T. F. (1992). Effect of magnesium supplementation on strength training in humans. Journal of the American College of Nutrition,11(3), 326-329.

Pine Bark Extract:
1. Liu, X., Wei, J., Tan, F., Zhou, S., Würthwein, G., & Rohdewald, P. (2004). Pycnogenol®, French maritime pine bark extract, improves endothelial function of hypertensive patients. Life sciences, 74(7), 855-862.