SlimWhey™

$59.99

PREMIUM WOMEN’S SLIMMING PROTEIN SHAKE*

  • – Unique combination of protein and proven fat burners made specifically for HER*
  • – 20 grams of protein per serving from whey isolate & whey peptides
  • – Supports increases in lean mass*
  • – May aid in fat/weight loss efforts*
  • – Delicious taste
  • – 100 calories per serving

 

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Description

It’s about time that women have a nutritional protein drink designed for them! SlimWhey™ is a lean protein drink that is scientifically engineered to promote lean muscle growth and support muscle recovery. What’s more, SlimWhey’s™ cutting edge formula includes a carefully crafted Tone & Trim Matrix designed to supercharge your metabolism & assist in healthy weight loss. Each serving of SlimWhey™ is loaded with:

Whey Protein Peptides – This form of whey is predigested, which results in faster absorption and release of amino acids into the blood stream. This rapidly sparks muscle protein synthesis when consumed after exercise and leads to muscle repair and rebuilding.
Whey Protein Isolate – Whey protein isolates digest and absorb rapidly and are, gram for gram, the most refined and purest form of protein (90-98% pure protein).
GlycoCarn® and L-Carnitine Tartrate – Without Carnitine, fats cannot be metabolized, so SLIM WHEY™ uses 2 specialized forms of Carnitine to escort body fats into the mitochondria to be broken down.
Medium Chain Triglycerides – While Carnitine takes the vast majority of fats to meet their maker, MCTs get there all on their own – no assistance required, leaving more Carnitine to dispose of body fat.
CLA – Verified time and time again by rigorous scientific research to activate mechanisms preliminary to thermogenesis and fat oxidation, while simultaneously showing the capacity to aid muscle development.

Supplementing with SlimWhey™ on a daily basis provides nutritional support for lean muscle tissue, fat loss, and recovery. When building muscle while simultaneously losing fat is your main goal there is only one way to go….the SlimWhey™!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Ingredient Profile

Whey Protein Isolate:

Whey protein isolates digest and absorb rapidly and are, gram for gram, the most refined and purest form of protein (90-98% pure protein).

  • It is also a potent stimulator of muscle protein synthesis due to its ability to causes a rapid increase in amino acids found in the blood stream.
  • This form of whey contains little to no lactose so it may be beneficial for individuals who experience GI problems. Also due to the refinement process whey isolate contains little fat, carbs, and milk sugars.
  • A 2006 study conducted by Cribb et al. found recreational bodybuilders who supplemented with whey protein isolate in conjunction with a 10 week resistance training program achieved greater gains in lean mass, strength, and decreases in body fat compared to a placebo group.

Whey Protein Peptides:

Whey protein peptides are pre-digested proteins (broken down into amino acids).

  • This breakdown leads to faster absorption by the body thus rapidly rebuilding and repairing muscles after a workout.

TONE AND TRIM MATRIX

FIBERSOL-2:

Fibersol-2 is a dietary fiber that is a digestion resistant maltodextrin. Fibersol-2 will help aid in the digestion of the protein.

Taurine:

Taurine has a myriad of benefits. From helping the body to metabolize fat, improving insulin sensitivity, raising testosterone levels, as an antioxidant, higher performance and quicker recovery during athletic training and increasing cardiovascular health… it goes without saying that taurine is a great ingredient to have in your wheelhouse

  • Zhang et al. (2004) found that individuals who supplemented with taurine for 1 week before an exhaustive exercise bout significantly improved time to exhaustion, VO2 max, and maximal workload. It also decreased exercise induced DNA damage.

GlycoCarn® (Glycine Propionyl-L-Carnitine HCL):

Glycocarn is a highly bioavailable form of Carnitine. Carnitine is crucial in muscle function by regulating energy flow across the cell membranes during strenuous activity.

  • Glycocarn can help increase nitric oxide levels. Increasing Nitric Oxide helps blood flow to organs and muscles and optimizes oxygen and nutrient delivery to the muscles.
  • All this can help to increase aerobic power, stamina, endurance, and recovery.
  • Jacobs et al. (2009) discovered that resistance trained males who supplemented with Glycocarn 90 minutes before exercise were able to increase peak power production (2-15%) and decrease lactic acid accumulation (15-17%).

L-Carnitine Tartrate:

L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is derived from lysine and methionine and is essential for transporting long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria for subsequent fat breakdown and energy production.

  • L-Carnitine has also been shown to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, muscular fatigue, and reduce soreness.
  • A study conducted by Volek et al. (2002) found that supplementation with L-Carnitine daily for one week in healthy resistance trained men was able to reduce markers of muscle damage after weight lifting. It was also discovered that biomarkers of oxidative damage reduced to baseline sooner than placebo.
  • Ho et al. (2010) discovered that middle aged males and females who supplemented with L-Carnitine over a 24-day period experienced less muscle damage and soreness following exercise and had less oxidative markers in serum after exercise.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA):

Most humans get their consumption of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) through butter. It is found mostly in meat and dairy products.

  • CLA is known for its body weight management properties which include reducing body fat, increasing lean muscle mass, and supporting efficient fat metabolism.
  • CLA is a slightly altered form of linoleic acid (LA), an omega-6 fatty acid important to human health. There have been some cancer-fighting properties found in studies.
  • CLA is also a potent anti-oxidant and anti-catabolite, as well as powerful immune enhancer.
  • Chen et al. (2012) discovered 12 weeks of CLA supplementation in overweight and obese subjects was able to reduce body weight and fat mass compared to placebo.

Lecithin:

Lecithin aids in fat transport and fat metabolism. Lecithin does this through its inherent role as an emulsifying agent.

  • This feature of lecithin functions to break down the fat and disperse it in water and/or in our bloodstream.
FAQs

Q: What is the best way to take SlimWhey?
A: Take 1 serving (1 Scoop) of SlimWhey™ with 10-12 oz of cold water
or any beverage of your choice. For optimal flavor & consistency, mix in a blender with ice.

Q: How much protein should I consume daily?
A: Research suggests in order to optimizes muscle growth and recovery that individuals should consume 1.5 – 2 grams per kg body weight daily. This amount is often hard to meet through a regular diet and often the reason individuals turn to protein supplementation.

Q: Is consuming too much protein bad for your kidneys?
A: Absolutely not. This is a myth. No piece of scientific literature exists showing that eating a high protein diet has any detrimental effects on renal function in otherwise healthy individuals.

Q: What other MuscleSport For Her products should I stack with SlimWhey?
A: In order to support lean muscle and fat loss we recommend stacking SlimWhey with our SlimKit 24 hour weight loss system and our For Her pre-workout Rhino for Her.

References

Whey protein isolate:
1. Hayes, A., & Cribb, P. J. (2008). Effect of whey protein isolate on strength, body composition and muscle hypertrophy during resistance training. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care, 11(1), 40-44.
2. Pal, S., Ellis, V., & Dhaliwal, S. (2010). Effects of whey protein isolate on body composition, lipids, insulin and glucose in overweight and obese individuals. British journal of nutrition, 104(05), 716-723.
3. Burd, N. A., Yang, Y., Moore, D. R., Tang, J. E., Tarnopolsky, M. A., & Phillips, S. M. (2012). Greater stimulation of myofibrillar protein synthesis with ingestion of whey protein isolate v. micellar casein at rest and after resistance exercise in elderly men. British Journal of nutrition, 108(06), 958-962.
4. Cooke, M. B., Rybalka, E., Stathis, C. G., Cribb, P. J., & Hayes, A. (2010). Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 30.
5. Renan, M., Mekmene, O., Famelart, M. H., Guyomarc’h, F., Arnoult-Delest, V., Pâquet, D., & Brulé, G. (2006). pH-Dependent behaviour of soluble protein aggregates formed during heat-treatment of milk at pH 6· 5 or 7· 2. Journal of dairy research, 73(01), 79-86.
6. Whetstine, M. C., Croissant, A. E., & Drake, M. A. (2005). Characterization of dried whey protein concentrate and isolate flavor. Journal of dairy science,88(11), 3826-3839.

Whey protein peptides:
1. Farup, J., Rahbek, S. K., Vendelbo, M. H., Matzon, A., Hindhede, J., Bejder, A., … & Vissing, K. (2014). Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode. Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, 24(5), 788-798.
2. Calbet, J. A., & MacLean, D. A. (2002). Plasma glucagon and insulin responses depend on the rate of appearance of amino acids after ingestion of different protein solutions in humans. The Journal of nutrition, 132(8), 2174-2182.
3. Calbet, J. A., & Holst, J. J. (2004). Gastric emptying, gastric secretion and enterogastrone response after administration of milk proteins or their peptide hydrolysates in humans. European journal of nutrition, 43(3), 127-139.
4. Buckley, J. D., Thomson, R. L., Coates, A. M., Howe, P. R., DeNichilo, M. O., & Rowney, M. K. (2010). Supplementation with a whey protein hydrolysate enhances recovery of muscle force-generating capacity following eccentric exercise. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13(1), 178-181.

Fibersol-2:
1. Ohkuma, K., & Wakabayashi, S. (2001). Fibersol‐2: A Soluble, Non‐Digestible, Starch‐Derived Dietary Fibre. Advanced dietary fibre technology, 509-523.
2. Quigley, M. E., Hudson, G. J., & Englyst, H. N. (1999). Determination of resistant short-chain carbohydrates (non-digestible oligosaccharides) using gas–liquid chromatography. Food chemistry, 65(3), 381-390.
3. Cho, S. S., & Samuel, P. (Eds.). (2009). Fiber ingredients: Food applications and health benefits. CRC Press.
4. Rodríguez-Cabezas, M. E., Camuesco, D., Arribas, B., Garrido-Mesa, N., Comalada, M., Bailón, E., … & Gálvez, J. (2010). The combination of fructooligosaccharides and resistant starch shows prebiotic additive effects in rats. Clinical nutrition, 29(6), 832-839.

Taurine:
1. Zhang, M., Izumi, I., Kagamimori, S., Sokejima, S., Yamagami, T., Liu, Z., & Qi, B. (2004). Role of taurine supplementation to prevent exercise-induced oxidative stress in healthy young men. Amino acids, 26(2), 203-207.
2. BOUCHAMA, A., YUSUF, A., AL-SEDAIRY, S. U. L. T. A. N., & EL-YAZIGI, A. D. N. A. N. (1993). Alteration of taurine homeostasis in acute heatstroke.Critical care medicine, 21(4), 551-554.
3. Gwacham, N., & Wagner, D. R. (2012). Acute effects of a caffeine-taurine energy drink on repeated sprint performance of American college football players. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 22(2), 109-116.
4. Warskulat, U., Brookmann, S., Felsner, I., Brenden, H., Grether‐Beck, S., & Häussinger, D. (2008). Ultraviolet A induces transport of compatible organic osmolytes in human dermal fibroblasts. Experimental dermatology, 17(12), 1031-1036.

GlycoCarn:
1. Long-term glycine propionyl-l-carnitine supplemention and paradoxical effects on repeated anaerobic sprint performance. Jacobs PL, Goldstein ER. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2010 Oct 28;7:35. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-7-35.
2. Glycine propionyl-L-carnitine modulates lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide in human subjects. Bloomer RJ, Tschume LC, Smith WA. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2009 May;79(3):131-41. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831.79.3.131.

L-Carnitine Tartrate:
1. Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., French, D. N., Rubin, M. R., Sharman, M. J., Gómez, A. L., … & Hakkinen, K. (2003). The effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation on hormonal responses to resistance exercise and recovery. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 17(3), 455-462.
2. Spiering, B. A., Kraemer, W. J., Vingren, J. L., Hatfield, D. L., Fragala, M. S., Ho, J. Y., … & Volek, J. S. (2007). Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 21(1), 259-264.
3. Ho, J. Y., Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., Fragala, M. S., Thomas, G. A., Dunn-Lewis, C., … & Maresh, C. M. (2010). l-Carnitine l-tartrate supplementation favorably affects biochemical markers of recovery from physical exertion in middle-aged men and women. Metabolism, 59(8), 1190-1199.
4. Broad, E. M., Maughan, R. J., & Galloway, S. D. (2008). Carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism during exercise after oral carnitine supplementation in humans.
5. Dehghani, M., Shakerian, S., Nejad, S. H., & Gharib-Naseri, M. K. (2015). Effects of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate Acute Consumption on Lipid Metabolism, Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), and distance run Following Aerobic Exhaustive Exercise on Treadmill in Elite Athletes wrestling. The AYER, 2, 189-195.

CLA:
1. Whingham LD, Watras CA, Scholler DA (2007). Efficacy of conjugated linoleic acid for reducing fat mass: a meta-analysis in humans. Am. J Clin Nutr 85 (5): 1203–1200
2. Smedman, A., & Vessby, B. (2001). Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in humans—metabolic effects. Lipids, 36(8), 773-781.
3. Belury, M.A. (October 2002). Inhibition of carcinogenesis by conjugated linoleic acid: Potential mechanisms of action. Journal of Nutrition 132 (10): 2995–2998
4. Bhattacharya A, Banu J, Rahman M, Causey J, Fernandes G. (December 2006). Biological effects of conjugated linoleic acids in health and disease. J Nutr Biochem. 17 (12): 789–810
5. Cannella C and Giusti AM (2000) Conjugated linoleic acid: a natural anticarcinogenic substance from animal food. Ital. J Food Sc, 12:123-27.
6. Lawson, RE, Moss, AR & Givens, DI (2001) The role of dairy products in supplying conjugated linoleic acid to man’s diet: a review. Nutrition Research Reviews 14, 153-172.
7. Vaughan, R. A., Garcia-Smith, R., Bisoffi, M., Conn, C. A., & Trujillo, K. A. (2012). Conjugated linoleic acid or omega 3 fatty acids increase mitochondrial biosynthesis and metabolism in skeletal muscle cells. Lipids in health and disease, 11(1), 1.

Lecithin:
1. Glomset, J. A. (1972). The metabolic role of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase: perspectives from pathology. Advances in lipid research,11, 1-65.
2. O’doherty, P. J. A., Kakis, G., & Kuksis, A. (1973). Role of luminal lecithin in intestinal fat absorption. Lipids, 8(5), 249-255.
3. Augur, V., Rollman, H. S., & Deuel Jr, H. J. (1947). The effect of crude lecithin on the coefficient of digestibility and the rate of absorption of fat.Journal of Nutrition, 33, 177-186.
4. Spilburg, C. A., Goldberg, A. C., McGill, J. B., Stenson, W. F., Racette, S. B., Bateman, J., … & Ostlund, R. E. (2003). Fat-free foods supplemented with soy stanol-lecithin powder reduce cholesterolabsorption and LDL cholesterol. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 103(5), 577-581.

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