AlphaBurn™

$69.99

  • 5 Thermogenic, Fat Burning Compounds*
  • Energy & Focus Matrix
  • Estrogen Management*
  • Clinically Dosed Ingredients & Fully Transparent Label
  • Delicious Flavors
  • 30 Servings Per Container
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Description

MuscleSport AlphaBurn combines two forms of L-Carnitine, proven by research to aid in lipid metabolism and ATP production, with novel, patented thermogenics and metabolism boosting ingredients that creates a perfect synergy to help you burn body fat, amplify cellular energy, and recover quicker from exercise-induced muscle damage. Take a look at AlphaBurn’s fully transparent label and you will find clinical doses of:

L-Carnitine Tartrate – Essential for transporting long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria for subsequent fat breakdown and energy production. L-Carnitine has also been shown to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, muscular fatigue, and reduce soreness.*

L–Carnitine Fumarate – Combined, L-Carnitine and Fumarate provide dual support for energizing the heart and skeletal muscles.*

Paradoxine® Aframomum Melegueta Seed Extract – Research shows this compound can activate brown adipose tissue and increase whole-body energy expenditure.*

CapsiAtra™ – Increases resting energy expenditure (REE) – allowing the body to burn off more calories than normal, and stimulates thermogenesis – allowing the body to burn calories off of stored fats.*

Lean GBB® – Elevates the body’s production of L-Carnitine and helps improve energy levels and athletic performance.*

If you are serious about changing your physique and are following a proper diet and exercise program, then AlphaBurn can help you reach your body composition goals. Using key ingredients backed by scientific studies, AlphaBurn is an innovative and groundbreaking formula that will deliver amazing results.

Ingredient Profile

L-Carnitine Tartrate:

L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is derived from lysine and methionine and is essential for transporting long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria for subsequent fat breakdown and energy production.

  • L-Carnitine has also been shown to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, muscular fatigue, and reduce soreness.
  • A study conducted by Volek et al. (2002) found that supplementation with L-Carnitine daily for one week in healthy resistance trained men was able to reduce markers of muscle damage after weight lifting. It was also discovered that biomarkers of oxidative damage reduced to baseline sooner than placebo.
  • Ho et al. (2010) discovered that middle aged males and females who supplemented with L-Carnitine over a 24-day period experienced less muscle damage and soreness following exercise and had less oxidative markers in serum after exercise.

L-Carnitine Fumarate:

Fumarate, or fumaric acid, is an important compound, which is also naturally present in the body.

  • As a component of the Krebs cycle (Citric Acid Cycle), fumaric acid plays a key role in generating energy.
  • Combined, l-carnitine and fumarate provide dual support for energizing the heart and skeletal muscles.

Paradoxine® Aframomum Melegueta Seed Extract:

Aframomum melegueta is a spice with a similar composition as Ginger.

  • It shows some promise in fat-mass control.
  • It has been shown to have an impact on increasing metabolic rate.
  • A study by Suqita et al. (2013) found that men who supplemented with aframomum melegueta for four weeks were able to activate brown adipose tissue and increase whole-body energy expenditure.

Lean GBB®:

Gamma-butyrobetaine ethyl ester chloride is a precursor for L-Carnitine.

  • GBB-EEC has the ability to increase the body’s production of L-Carnitine and can help improve energy levels and athletic performance.
  • Higher L-Carnitine levels also helps to promote fat loss and immune system support.

CapsiAtra:

CapsiAtra™ is a dihydrocapsiate compound naturally found in CH-19 Sweet peppers that holds clinical benefits in weight management, endurance and metabolism.

  • CapsiAtra™ has the ability to increase resting energy expenditure (REE) – allowing the body to burn off more calories than normal, and stimulate thermogenesis – allowing the body to burn calories off of stored fats.
  • It also enhances glycogen sparing, promoting an increase in energy production through the burning off of fat stored within the body instead of carbohydrates.
  • Galgani et al. (2010) discovered subjects who supplemented with Dihydrocapsiate over a one-month period were able to increase their resting metabolic rate on a daily basis compared to placebo.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin):

  • Niacin is a form of Vitamin B3. Vitamin B3 is found in many foods including yeast, meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, beans, and cereal grains.
  • Niacin promotes health in the nervous system, digestive system, skin, hair and eyes.
  • Niacin has long been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or the “good,” cholesterol. HDL cholesterol helps sweep up low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or the “bad,” cholesterol, in your bloodstream.
  • Niacin also helps improve liver function, metabolize food, and helps your adrenal glands produce sex and stress hormones.
  • Niacin is also known for increasing blood circulation.
  • Blond et al. discovered in 20 men without diabetes but with dyslipidemia, 2g niacin supplementation over the course of eight weeks promoted a reduction in triglycerides (28%) and vLDL (68%) while increasing HDL cholesterol (17%).

Caffeine Anhydrous:

Multiple studies have confirmed caffeine can improve muscular endurance and power, focus and cognitive performance, and improve energy levels.

  • Caffeine has also been shown to have a thermogenic effect (heating/calorie burning) at rest and may increase the use of fats for fuel during exercise.
  • Doherty and Smith performed a meta-analysis of caffeine’s effects on perceived exertion and found a 5.6% decrease in RPE (rating of perceived exhertion) during exercise.  This means exercise may feel easier at higher effort levels when supplementing with caffeine.

N-phenethyldimethylamine (from Eria Jarensis):

Eria extract contains a compound called N-Phenyldimethylamine which is chemically similar to DMAA.

  • This means it produces many of the same ergogenic effects such as enhancing mood, improving focus, and creating a feeling of euphoria.
  • This is due to N-Phenyldimethylamine’s function as a neuromodulator in the central nervous system that boosts dopamine (the feel good neurotransmitter) levels.

Rauwolscine:

Rauwolscine is an ingredient very similar in structure and effect to Yohimbe  but may be more potent.

  • Rauwolscine can act as an Alpha(2)Adrenergic antagonist and thus aid in fat burning.
  • It also shares the same stimulating and mood-elevating effects as yohimbe.

Zingerone Extract:

Ginger is a spice that can reduce nausea and ease digestion quite effectively.

  • It is commonly used to treat a myriad of stomach problems.  It helps to reduce everything from heartburn to gas and diarrhea.
  • Ginger is believed to be a mild appetite suppressant. Anecdotal evidence supports people feeling “more full” when taking a ginger supplement.
  • A meta-analysis conducted by Ernst et al. (2000) found ginger was able to reduce nausea induced by seasickness, morning sickness, and chemotherapy induced sickeness.

L-Tyrosine:

L-Tyrosine helps to activate metabolic pathways that produce the hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine – which are typically produced during moments of stress on the body and provide a boost in the terms of a “fight or flight” scenario.

  • Epinephrine and norepinephrine are depleted quickly during these moments of stress due to a lack of L-Tyronsine.
  • The addition of this amino acid to AlphaBurn will help give you an extra PUSH and can make a big difference to help you FIGHT through your workouts and plateaus.
  • Hoffman et al. (2010) research results indicate that acute ingestion of supplement including L-tyrosine and anhydrous caffeine, can maintain reaction time, and subjective feelings of focus and alertness to both visual and auditory stimuli in healthy college students following exhaustive exercise.

Higenamine:

Higenamine Hydrochloride is a proven beta 1 and 2 adrenergic agonist; meaning that when found in a pre-workout it can help improve focus, enhance mental clarity, increase energy, and burn body fat.

  • Higenamine has also been shown to open up lung capacity by relaxing the trachea, allowing more oxygen to get into your body during training.
  • While most stimulants do the opposite of vascular relaxation and vasodilation, higenmanine has been shown to do just this.

Acacetin:

Acacetin is a natural flavone that is found in the Damiana (Turnera diffusa) plant. Acacetin has been studied for a variety of reasons and some research suggests it may help support a healthy estrogen to testosterone balance.

  • Research suggests that Acacetin may support a healthy aromatase balance. Aromatase is the enzyme responsible for converting testosterone to estrogen.
  • Inhibition of the aromatase enzyme helps reduce the amount of testosterone that gets converted to estrogen.
  • Healthy regulation of the aromatase enzyme can help support healthy testosterone and estrogen levels.
  • Researchers at the University of Mississippi studied the anti-aromatase and estrogenic activity of 24 different compounds isolated from the damiana plant. Among the 24 tested compounds, acacetin showed the most potent aromatase inhibition. In fact, acacetin suppressed up to 63 percent of aromatase activity. The researchers concluded that acacetin could significantly suppress aromatase activity and was the only compound found to have potent anti-aromatase activity and absolutely no estrogenic effects.
FAQs

Q: What is the best way to take AlphaBurn?
A: Mix one serving (5g) with 8-10oz of water or your energy based pre-workout approximately 30 minutes prior to training.

Q: How does L-Carnitine work?
A: Simply put, L-Carnitine promotes the use of fats as “fuel” in your body by transporting long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria for subsequent fat breakdown and energy production.

Q: What is a thermogenic?
A: A thermogenic is any substance or ingredient that causes heat production…in this case in the body. Increased heat production can increase metabolism and the number of calories burned at rest or during exercise.

References

L-Carnitine Tartrate/Fumarate:
1. Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., French, D. N., Rubin, M. R., Sharman, M. J., Gómez, A. L., … & Hakkinen, K. (2003). The effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation on hormonal responses to resistance exercise and recovery. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 17(3), 455-462.
2. Spiering, B. A., Kraemer, W. J., Vingren, J. L., Hatfield, D. L., Fragala, M. S., Ho, J. Y., … & Volek, J. S. (2007). Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 21(1), 259-264.
3. Ho, J. Y., Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., Fragala, M. S., Thomas, G. A., Dunn-Lewis, C., … & Maresh, C. M. (2010). l-Carnitine l-tartrate supplementation favorably affects biochemical markers of recovery from physical exertion in middle-aged men and women. Metabolism, 59(8), 1190-1199.
4. Broad, E. M., Maughan, R. J., & Galloway, S. D. (2008). Carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism during exercise after oral carnitine supplementation in humans.
5. Dehghani, M., Shakerian, S., Nejad, S. H., & Gharib-Naseri, M. K. (2015). Effects of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate Acute Consumption on Lipid Metabolism, Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), and distance run Following Aerobic Exhaustive Exercise on Treadmill in Elite Athletes wrestling. The AYER, 2, 189-195.

Aframomum Melegueta:

1. Sugita, J., Yoneshiro, T., Hatano, T., Aita, S., Ikemoto, T., Uchiwa, H., … & Saito, M. (2013). Grains of paradise (Aframomum melegueta) extract activates brown adipose tissue and increases whole-body energy expenditure in men. British Journal of Nutrition, 110(04), 733-738.
2. Iwami, M., Mahmoud, F. A., Shiina, T., Hirayama, H., Shima, T., Sugita, J., & Shimizu, Y. (2011). Extract of grains of paradise and its active principle 6-paradol trigger thermogenesis of brown adipose tissue in rats. Autonomic Neuroscience, 161(1), 63-67.

CapsiAtra™ (Dihydrocapsiate):
1. Galgani, J. E., & Ravussin, E. (2010). Effect of dihydrocapsiate on resting metabolic rate in humans. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 92(5), 1089-1093.
2. Lee, T. A., Li, Z., Zerlin, A., & Heber, D. (2010). Effects of dihydrocapsiate on adaptive and diet-induced thermogenesis with a high protein very low calorie diet: a randomized control trial. Nutrition & metabolism, 7(1), 1.
3. Galgani, J. E., Ryan, D. H., & Ravussin, E. (2010). Effect of capsinoids on energy metabolism in human subjects. British journal of nutrition, 103(01), 38-42.
4. Inoue, N., Matsunaga, Y., Satoh, H., & Takahashi, M. (2007). Enhanced energy expenditure and fat oxidation in humans with high BMI scores by the ingestion of novel and non-pungent capsaicin analogues (capsinoids). Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry, 71(2), 380-389.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin):
1. Elam, M. B., Hunninghake, D. B., Davis, K. B., Garg, R., Johnson, C., Egan, D., … & ADMIT Investigators. (2000). Effect of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein levels and glycemic control in patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial disease: the ADMIT study: a randomized trial. Jama,284(10), 1263-1270.
2. Goldberg, A., Alagona, P., Capuzzi, D. M., Guyton, J., Morgan, J. M., Rodgers, J., … & Samuel, P. (2000). Multiple-dose efficacy and safety of an extended-release form of niacin in the management of hyperlipidemia. The American journal of cardiology, 85(9), 1100-1105.
3. Guyton, J. R. (2007). Niacin in cardiovascular prevention: mechanisms, efficacy, and safety. Current opinion in lipidology, 18(4), 415-420.

Zingerone:
1. Ernst, E., & Pittler, M. H. (2000). Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. British journal of anaesthesia, 84(3), 367-371.
2. Chaiyakunapruk, N., Kitikannakorn, N., Nathisuwan, S., Leeprakobboon, K., & Leelasettagool, C. (2006). The efficacy of ginger for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a meta-analysis. American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 194(1), 95-99.
3. Smith, C., Crowther, C., Willson, K., Hotham, N., & McMillian, V. (2004). A randomized controlled trial of ginger to treat nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 103(4), 639-645.
4. Black, C. D., Herring, M. P., Hurley, D. J., & O’Connor, P. J. (2010). Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces muscle pain caused by eccentric exercise. The Journal of Pain, 11(9), 894-903.
5. Wu, K. L., Rayner, C. K., Chuah, S. K., Changchien, C. S., Lu, S. N., Chiu, Y. C., … & Lee, C. M. (2008). Effects of ginger on gastric emptying and motility in healthy humans. European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology, 20(5), 436-440.
6. Wu, K. L., Rayner, C. K., Chuah, S. K., Changchien, C. S., Lu, S. N., Chiu, Y. C., … & Lee, C. M. (2008). Effects of ginger on gastric emptying and motility in healthy humans. European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology, 20(5), 436-440.

Caffeine:
1. Goldstein, E. R., Ziegenfuss, T., Kalman, D., Kreider, R., Campbell, B., Wilborn, C., … & Wildman, R. (2010). International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 5.
2. Spriet, L. L. (1995). Caffeine and performance. International journal of sport nutrition, 5, S84-S84.
3. Beck, T. W., Housh, T. J., Schmidt, R. J., Johnson, G. O., Housh, D. J., Coburn, J. W., & Malek, M. H. (2006). The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on strength, muscular endurance, and anaerobic capabilities. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 20(3), 506-510.
4. McLellan, T. M., Kamimori, G. H., Voss, D. M., Tate, C., & Smith, S. J. (2007). Caffeine effects on physical and cognitive performance during sustained operations. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine, 78(9), 871-877.
5. Lieberman, H. R., Tharion, W. J., Shukitt-Hale, B., Speckman, K. L., & Tulley, R. (2002). Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during US Navy SEAL training. Psychopharmacology, 164(3), 250-261.
6. Costill, D. L., Dalsky, G. P., & Fink, W. J. (1977). Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance. Medicine and science in sports, 10(3), 155-158.
7. Kovacs, E. M., Stegen, J. H., & Brouns, F. (1998). Effect of caffeinated drinks on substrate metabolism, caffeine excretion, and Performance. Journal of Applied physiology, 85(2), 709-715.

N-Phenyldimethylamine:
1. Zhang, Y., Woods, R. M., Breitbach, Z. S., & Armstrong, D. W. (2012). 1, 3‐Dimethylamylamine (DMAA) in supplements and geranium products: natural or synthetic?. Drug testing and analysis, 4(12), 986-990.
2. Li, J. S., Chen, M., & Li, Z. C. (2012). Identification and quantification of dimethylamylamine in geranium by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Analytical chemistry insights, 7, 47.
3. Hedman, K., Leander, K., & Luning, B. (1969). STUDIES ON ORCHIDACEAE ALKALOIDS. 15. PHENETHYLAMINES FROM ERIA-JARENSIS AMES. ACTA CHEMICA SCANDINAVICA, 23(9), 3261.

Rauwolscine:
1. Perry, B. D., & U’Prichard, D. C. (1981). [3 H] Rauwolscine (α-yohimbine): A specific antagonist radioligand for brain α 2-adrenergic receptors. European journal of pharmacology, 76(4), 461-464.
2. Rockhold, R. W., & Gross, F. (1981). Yohimbine diastereoisomers: Cardiovascular effects after central and peripheral application in the rat.Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s archives of pharmacology, 315(3), 227-231.
3. Arthur, J. M., Casańas, S. J., & Raymond, J. R. (1993). Partial agonist properties of rauwolscine and yohimbine for the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by recombinant human 5-HT 1A receptors. Biochemical pharmacology,45(11), 2337-2341.
4. Wainscott, D. B., Sasso, D. A., Kursar, J. D., Baez, M., Lucaites, V. L., & Nelson, D. L. (1997). [3H] Rauwolscine: an antagonist radioligand for the cloned human 5-hydroxytryptamine2B (5-HT2B) receptor. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s archives of pharmacology, 357(1), 17-2

L-Tyrosine:
1. Benedict, C. R., Anderson, G. H., & Sole, M. J. (1983). The influence of oral tyrosine and tryptophan feeding on plasma catecholamines in man. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 38(3), 429-435.
2. Alonso, R., Gibson, C. J., Wurtman, R. J., Agharanya, J. C., & Prieto, L. (1982). Elevation of urinary catecholamines and their metabolites following tyrosine administration in humans. Biological psychiatry, 17(7), 781-790.
3. Agharanya, J. C., Alonso, R., & Wurtman, R. J. (1981). Changes in catecholamine excretion after short-term tyrosine ingestion in normally fed human subjects. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 34(1), 82-87.
4. Acworth, I. N., During, M. J., & Wurtman, R. J. (1988). Tyrosine: effects on catecholamine release. Brain research bulletin, 21(3), 473-477.
5. Neri, D. F., Wiegmann, D., Stanny, R. R., Shappell, S. A., McCardie, A., & McKay, D. L. (1995). The effects of tyrosine on cognitive performance during extended wakefulness. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine.

Higenamine:
1. Bai, G., Yang, Y., Shi, Q., Liu, Z., & Zhang, Q. (2008). Identification of higenamine in Radix Aconiti Lateralis Preparata as a beta2‐adrenergic receptor agonist1. Acta Pharmacologica Sinica, 29(10), 1187-1194.
2. Kam, S. C., Do, J. M., Choi, J. H., Jeon, B. T., Roh, G. S., Chang, K. C., & Hyun, J. S. (2012). The relaxation effect and mechanism of action of higenamine in the rat corpus cavernosum. International journal of impotence research, 24(2), 77-83.
3. Tsukiyama, M., Ueki, T., Yasuda, Y., Kikuchi, H., Akaishi, T., Okumura, H., & Abe, K. (2009). Beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated tracheal relaxation induced by higenamine from Nandina domestica Thunberg. Planta medica, 75(13), 1393-1399.
4. Zhou, S. J., & Du, G. Y. (2003). [Effects of higenamine on the cardio-circulatory system]. Zhongguo Zhong yao za zhi= Zhongguo zhongyao zazhi= China journal of Chinese materia medica, 28(10), 910-913.
5. Kang, Y. J., Lee, Y. S., Lee, G. W., Lee, D. H., Ryu, J. C., Yun-Choi, H. S., & Chang, K. C. (1999). Inhibition of activation of nuclear factor κB is responsible for inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by higenamine, an active component of aconite root. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 291(1), 314-320.
6. Pyo, M. K., Lee, D. H., Kim, D. H., Lee, J. H., Moon, J. C., Chang, K. C., & Yun-Choi, H. S. (2008). Enantioselective synthesis of (R)-(+)-and (S)-(−)-higenamine and their analogues with effects on platelet aggregation and experimental animal model of disseminated intravascular coagulation.Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters, 18(14), 4110-4114.

Acacetin:
1. Zhao, J., Dasmahapatra, A. K., Khan, S. I., & Khan, I. A. (2008). Anti-aromatase activity of the constituents from damiana (Turnera diffusa).Journal of ethnopharmacology, 120(3), 387-393.