Thermal Revolution™

$59.99

SUPER POTENT THERMOGENIC*

  • – Clinically dosed ingredients that work in synergy to burn fat*
  • – Makes dieting and training efforts more effective*
  • – Increases energy, alertness, & reduces appetite*
  • – Enhances metabolism, insulin sensitivity, & fat oxidation*
  • – Contains CapsiAtra™ – A dihydrocapsiate compound that holds clinical benefits in weight management, endurance and metabolism*

SKU: 9275 Category:
Description

There is a lot of boasting in the competitive world of athletics, so it should come as no surprise that this extends into the sports supplement industry. Here at MuscleSport, we don’t need to tell you that THERMAL Revolution is exceptionally effective – you can see it for yourself just by taking a look at the formula. Because unlike the rest, THERMAL Revolution does not need to hide behind proprietary blends.

Caffeine Anhydrous and Infinergy™ DiCaffeine Malate – Caffeine is well-known, but this is not your typical caffeine. The addition of malate to two caffeine molecules smoothes any agitation from and prolongs the metabolic-boosting effects of caffeine.
CapsiAtra™ Capsaicin – Enhances insulin sensitivity, protecting your hard-working body from storing carbohydrates as body fat and stuffing your muscles full of glycogen.
Hordenine – Induces a burst of adrenaline, giving a huge boost to metabolism while simultaneously enhancing blood flow.
Isopropylnorsynephrine – Synephrine is found in bitter oranges and is structurally similar to ephedrine, which gives it the capability of increasing fat oxidation, but without the negative side effects.

What you see is the result of countless hours of research and development. Clinically dosed ingredients create a synergistic combination, working together to make your dieting and training efforts more effective. With THERMAL Revolution, you don’t need to worry about cutting through all the bull, we’ve done it for you! All that’s left to do is let THERMAL Revolution cut through the fat.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Ingredient Profile

Product Description

Vitamin B3 (Niacin):

Niacin is a form of Vitamin B3. Vitamin B3 is found in many foods including yeast, meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, beans, and cereal grains.

  • Niacin promotes health in the nervous system, digestive system, skin, hair and eyes.
  • Niacin has long been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or the “good,” cholesterol. HDL cholesterol helps sweep up low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or the “bad,” cholesterol, in your bloodstream.
  • Niacin also helps improve liver function, metabolize food, and helps your adrenal glands produce sex and stress hormones.
  • Niacin is also known for increasing blood circulation.
  • Blond et al. discovered in 20 men without diabetes but with dyslipidemia, 2g niacin supplementation over the course of eight weeks promoted a reduction in triglycerides (28%) and vLDL (68%) while increasing HDL cholesterol (17%).

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine):

B6 is a water soluble vitamin that is important to various metabolic reactions that occur in the body. It is also a coenzyme for protein metabolism and nervous and immune system function. Furthermore, it is involved in the synthesis of hormones and red blood cells.

  • B6 helps to protect the heart from cholesterol deposits and helps to prevent kidney stone formation.
  • B6 also helps activate coenzymes that are important in metabolism.

Chromium (Chromium Polynicotinate):

Chromium is a mineral our bodies use in small amounts for normal body functions, such as digesting food.

  • Chromium helps move blood sugar from the bloodstream into the cells to be used as energy and to turn fats, carbohydrates, and proteins into energy.
  • Chromium also helps regulate fat and cholesterol in the body, and may reduce food craving.
  • A study conducted by Anton et al. (2008) found that subjects supplementing with chromium over an 8 week period reduced hunger, cravings, and lost more weight compared to a placebo group.

FAT ANNIHILATING COMPLEX

Caffeine Matrix (Caffeine Anhydrous, DiCaffeine Malate, Caffeine Citrate):

This blend of caffeine helps to provide effectively dosed stimulation for your training and not keep you up all night long.

  • It is also formulated to help fight that horrible crash you might experience with stimulated laden pre-workouts.
  • Multiple studies have confirmed can improve muscular endurance and power, focus and cognitive performance, and improve energy levels. Caffeine has also been shown to have a thermogenic effect (heating/calorie burning) at rest and may increase the use of fats for fuel during exercise.
  • Doherty and Smith performed a meta-analysis of caffeine’s effects on perceived exertion and found a 5.6% decrease in RPE (rating of perceived exhertion) during exercise.  This means exercise may feel easier at higher effort levels when supplementing with caffeine.

Beta-Phenylethylamine:

Beta- Phenylethylamine naturally occurs within the nervous systems of humans, where it is thought to act as a type of neuromodulator. It is considered to be a trace amine chemical and natural monamine alkaloid.

  • Within the human brain it causes the release of norepinephrine and dopamine, two very powerful brain chemicals involved in attention and alertness.
  • Beta- Phenylethylamine is used for many different purposes, among them cognitive enhancement, mood improvement, weight loss, and as a concentration aid.
  • Beta- Phenylethylamine may help to speed up the metabolism. This means that it can lead to an increased rate of fat burning.

Celery Seed Extract:

Celery seed oil is a supplement containing a high amount of volatile compounds known as phthalides. These compounds as well as the major component Sedanolide appear to have general antioxidative properties and have traditionally been used as a diuretic.

  • Celery seed extract may helps improve overall wellness, joint support, and digestive health.

Hordenine:

Extracted from the roots of sprouted barley, hordenine has an adrenaline-like effect stemming from its ability to release norandrenaline.

  • This increases heart rate and blood flow.
  • The adrenaline effect is long lasting and does not fade early in your workouts. This will create a boost in athletic performance throughout your entire workout.
  • Hordenine may also increase peripheral blood flow volume and have a positive inotropic effect (increases strength of contraction) upon the heart.
  • Lastly hordenine stimulates the central nervous system and promotes weight loss by enhancing metabolism.

Diindolylmethane (DIM):

DIM have diverse effects on estrogen metabolism. As stress of exercise goes up – hormones can be effected.

  • DIM has been shown to regulate estrogen at the receptor level to prevent it from reaching levels too high or too low.
  • DIIM also exerts numerous anti-carcinogenic (anti-cancer) effects in the body
  • A study done by Chang et al. (2011) using Indole-3-Carbinol (a precursor to DIM) noted that 5mg injections into the gut daily was able to attenuate the expected gain in body fat associated with a high fat/calorie diet.

Phosphatidylserine (PS):

Phosphatidylserine is an amino acid derivative compound that is fat-soluble and found in high amounts in the brain, where it contributes to cognitive functioning.

  • PS may improve memory and lower cortisol levels in the body.
  • Parker et al. (2011) discovered subjects who supplemented with PS over two weeks were able to increase speed of mathematical calculations (20%) and improve answer accuracy (13%) compared to placebo.

Advantra Z:

Advantra Z is derived from the immature bitter orange fruit, a GRAS (generally recognized as safe) food ingredient traditionally used for dietary and medicinal purposes.

  • Advantra Z activates receptors that promote the release of fat from fat cells where it can be used as energy.
  • Advantra Z may also suppress appetite and increase metabolism
  • Several studies exist showing that not only Advantra Z is very effective for fat loss, but it is also very safe.
  • Lopez et. al (2013) discovered subjects supplementing with a weight loss product containing Advantra Z were able to enhance body composition, reduce hip and waist girth, and increase energy levels in overweight me and women.

Halostachine:

Halostachine shares similarities with beta adrenergic receptor agonists. This means Halostachine will stimulate the beta receptors which are found on fat cells. This stimulation causes the fat to be burned as energy.

  • In an en vitro study of the pharmacodynamics and Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) of various epinephrine-like compounds, halostachine was demonstrated to be 19% as effective as epinephrine in activating beta2 receptors.

Synephrine:

Best known as an alternative for ephedrine, Synephrine has several of the same benefits of ephedrine but not nearly the same side-effects.

  • Syneprhrine can reduce appetite, increase alertness, burn fat, increase metabolism and increase energy.
  • However, like ephedrine, if you take this too close to bedtime – it could create some insomnia.
  • Stohs et al. (2011) found that a single dose of synephrine given to healthy subjects in a rested state increased resting metabolic rate without any negative influence on blood pressure or cognition.

Yohimbe HCL:

Yohimbe is an alkaloid that is considered a general stimulant that works by increasing adrenaline levels in the body.

  • In some cases Yohimbe increases blood vessel dilation which may enhance energy levels during workouts.
  • Increases in cognitive performance have also been noted in those supplementing with Yohimbe.
  • Yohimbe also may act as a fat burning compound by acting upon the adrenergic receptor system of fat cells, which regulate thermogenesis.
  • A study conducted by Ostojic (2006) found elite male soccer players who supplemented with Yohimbe for 21 days reduced average body fat levels from 9.3% to 7.1%

CapsiAtra™ (Dihydrocapsiate):

CapsiAtra™ is a dihydrocapsiate compound naturally found in CH-19 Sweet peppers that holds clinical benefits in weight management, endurance and metabolism.

  • CapsiAtra™ has the ability to increase resting energy expenditure (REE) – allowing the body to burn off more calories than normal, and stimulate thermogenesis – allowing the body to burn calories off of stored fats.
  • It also enhances glycogen sparing, promoting an increase in energy production through the burning off of fat stored within the body instead of carbohydrates.
  • Galgani et al. (2010) discovered subjects who supplemented with Dihydrocapsiate over a one month period were able to increase their resting metabolic rate on a daily basis compared to placebo.
FAQs

Q: What is the best way to take Thermal Revolution?
A: Take one serving (2 capsules) upon waking. Do not use longer than 60 days continuously.

Q: I see a full serving of Thermal Revolution has 375mg of caffeine. Is that amount safe?
A: Generally speaking, yes. A large review by the European Food Safety Authority concluded that a daily safe dose of 400mg is safe for adults.

Q: What is resting energy expenditure (REE) and thermogenesis?
A: REE is the amount of calories you burn at rest…for example when you are sitting on the couch. Thermogenesis is the simplest sense is production of heat in the human body which can have a calorie/fat burning effect. The ingredients found in Thermal Revolution help promote increases in REE and thermogenesis.

Q: What other MuscleSport products would you recommend stacking with Thermal Revolution?
A: To promote maximal fat burning we recommend stacking Thermal Revolution with Detox Revolution and LipoSlim Revolution.

References

Vitamin B3 (Niacin):
1. Elam, M. B., Hunninghake, D. B., Davis, K. B., Garg, R., Johnson, C., Egan, D., … & ADMIT Investigators. (2000). Effect of niacin on lipid and lipoprotein levels and glycemic control in patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial disease: the ADMIT study: a randomized trial. Jama,284(10), 1263-1270.
2. Goldberg, A., Alagona, P., Capuzzi, D. M., Guyton, J., Morgan, J. M., Rodgers, J., … & Samuel, P. (2000). Multiple-dose efficacy and safety of an extended-release form of niacin in the management of hyperlipidemia. The American journal of cardiology, 85(9), 1100-1105.
3. Guyton, J. R. (2007). Niacin in cardiovascular prevention: mechanisms, efficacy, and safety. Current opinion in lipidology, 18(4), 415-420.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine):
1. Czaja, J., Lebiedzinska, A., Marszall, M., & Szefer, P. (2011). Evaluation for magnesium and vitamin B6 supplementation among Polish elite athletes.Roczniki Państwowego Zakładu Higieny, 62(4).
2. Manore, M. M. (2000). Effect of physical activity on thiamine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 requirements. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 72(2), 598s-606s.
3. http://vitaminb6benefits.com/vitamin-b6-benefits

Chromium (Chromium Polynicotinate):
1. Parsons A, et al. A proof of concept randomised placebo controlled factorial trial to examine the efficacy of St John’s wort for smoking cessation and chromium to prevent weight gain on smoking cessation. Drug Alcohol Depend. (2009)
2. Abdollahi M, et al. Effect of chromium on glucose and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes; a meta-analysis review of randomized trials. J Pharm Pharm Sci. (2013)
3. Martin J, et al. Chromium picolinate supplementation attenuates body weight gain and increases insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care. (2006)
4. J Nutr Biochem. 2012 Apr;23(4):313-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2011.11.001. Molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance. Hua Y, Clark S, Ren J, Sreejayan N. College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Center for Cardiovascular Research and Alternative Medicine, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA.
5. R. I. Press, J. Geller, and G. W. Evans The effect of chromium picolinate on serum cholesterol and apolipoprotein fractions in human subjects.
6. Harry G. Preuss1,*, Nadeem Talpur1, Vijaya Manohar1, Nagaveni Venkataramiah1 and Richard A. Anderson Chromium and hypertension
7. Stephen D. Anton, Christopher D. Morrison, William T. Cefalu, Corby K. Martin, Sandra Coulon, Paula Geiselman, Hongmei Han, Christy L. White, and Donald A. Williamson. Effects of Chromium Picolinate on Food Intake and Satiety

Caffeine Matrix (Caffeine Anhydrous, DiCaffeine Malate, Caffeine Citrate):
1. Goldstein, E. R., Ziegenfuss, T., Kalman, D., Kreider, R., Campbell, B., Wilborn, C., … & Wildman, R. (2010). International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 5.
2. Spriet, L. L. (1995). Caffeine and performance. International journal of sport nutrition, 5, S84-S84.
3. Beck, T. W., Housh, T. J., Schmidt, R. J., Johnson, G. O., Housh, D. J., Coburn, J. W., & Malek, M. H. (2006). The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on strength, muscular endurance, and anaerobic capabilities. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 20(3), 506-510.
4. McLellan, T. M., Kamimori, G. H., Voss, D. M., Tate, C., & Smith, S. J. (2007). Caffeine effects on physical and cognitive performance during sustained operations. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine, 78(9), 871-877.
5. Lieberman, H. R., Tharion, W. J., Shukitt-Hale, B., Speckman, K. L., & Tulley, R. (2002). Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during US Navy SEAL training. Psychopharmacology, 164(3), 250-261.
6. Costill, D. L., Dalsky, G. P., & Fink, W. J. (1977). Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance. Medicine and science in sports, 10(3), 155-158.
7. Kovacs, E. M., Stegen, J. H., & Brouns, F. (1998). Effect of caffeinated drinks on substrate metabolism, caffeine excretion, and Performance. Journal of Applied physiology, 85(2), 709-715.

Beta-Phenylethylamine:
1. Sabelli HC, Borison RL, Diamond BI, Havdala HS, Narasimhachari N. Phenylethylamine and brain function. Biochem Pharmacol. 1978
2. Calvert R, Vohra S, Ferguson M, Wiesenfeld P. A beating heart cell model to predict cardiotoxicity: effects of the dietary supplement ingredients higenamine, phenylethylamine, ephedrine and caffeine. Food Chem Toxicol. 2015
3. Greenshaw AJ. Functional interactions of 2-phenylethylamine and of tryptamine with brain catecholamines: implications for psychotherapeutic drug action. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 1989
4. Nieforth KA. Psychotomimetic phenethylamines. J Pharm Sci. 1971
5. Heuson E, Storgaard M, Huynh TH, Charmantray F, Gefflaut T, Bunch L. Profiling substrate specificity of two series of phenethylamine analogs at monoamine oxidase A and B. Org Biomol Chem. 2014
6. Boulton AA, Juorio AV, Paterson IA. Phenylethylamine in the CNS: effects of monoamine oxidase inhibiting drugs, deuterium substitution and lesions and its role in the neuromodulation of catecholaminergic neurotransmission. J Neural Transm Suppl. 1990

Celery Seed Extract:
1. Ahmed B, Alam T, Varshney M, Khan SA. Hepatoprotective activity of two plants belonging to the Apiaceae and the Euphorbiaceae family. J Ethnopharmacol. 2002 Mar;79(3):313-6.
2. Al-Howiriny T, Alsheikh A, Alqasoumi S, Al-Yahya M, ElTahir K, Rafatullah S. Gastric antiulcer, antisecretory and cytoprotective properties of celery (Apium graveolens) in rats. Pharm Biol. 2010 Jul;48(7):786-93.
3. Atta AH, Alkofahi A. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of some Jordanian medicinal plant extracts. J Ethnopharmacol. 1998;60:117-124.
4. Banerjee S, Sharma R, Kale RK, Rao AR. Influence of certain essential oils on carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and acid-soluble sulfhydryls in mouse liver. Nutr Cancer. 1994;21:263-269. Abstract.
5. Boffa MJ, Gilmour E, Ead RD. Case report. Celery soup causing severe phototoxicity during PUVA therapy [letter]. Br J Dermatol. 1996;135(2):334.
6. Cheung MC, Lin LY, Yu TH, Peng RY. Hypolipidemic and antioxidant activity of mountian celery seed essential oils. J Agric Food Chem. 2008;56(11):3997-4003.

Hordenine:
1. Barwell, C. J., Basma, A. N., Lafi, M. A. K., & Leake, L. D. (1989). Deamination of hordenine by monoamine oxidase and its action on vasa deferentia of the rat. Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology, 41(6), 421-423.
2. Hapke, HJ, Strathmann, W. (1995). Pharmacological effects of Hordenine. Dtsch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 1995 Jun;102(6):228-32.
3. Frank, M., Weckman, T. J., Wood, T., Woods, W. E., TAI, C. L., CHANG, S. L., … & Tobin, T. (1990). Hordenine: pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and behavioural effects in the horse. Equine veterinary journal, 22(6), 437-441.

Diindolylmethane (DIM):
1. Lo, R., & Matthews, J. (2010). A New Class of Estrogen Receptor Beta–Selective Activators. Molecular interventions, 10(3), 133.
2. Leong, H., Riby, J. E., Firestone, G. L., & Bjeldanes, L. F. (2004). Potent ligand-independent estrogen receptor activation by 3, 3′-diindolylmethane is mediated by cross talk between the protein kinase A and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Molecular Endocrinology, 18(2), 291-302.
3. Leong, H., Firestone, G. L., & Bjeldanes, L. F. (2001). Cytostatic effects of 3, 3′-diindolylmethane in human endometrial cancer cells result from an estrogen receptor-mediated increase in transforming growth factor-α expression. Carcinogenesis, 22(11), 1809-1817.
4. Sanderson, J. T., Slobbe, L., Lansbergen, G. W., Safe, S., & Van den Berg, M. (2001). 2, 3, 7, 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and diindolylmethanes differentially induce cytochrome P450 1A1, 1B1, and 19 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells. Toxicological sciences, 61(1), 40-48.
5. Safe, S., Wang, F., Porter, W., Duan, R., & McDougal, A. (1998). Ah receptor agonists as endocrine disruptors: antiestrogenic activity and mechanisms. Toxicology letters, 102, 343-347.

Phosphatidylserine (PS):
1. Kingsley, M. I., Miller, M., Kilduff, L. P., McENENY, J. A. N. E., & Benton, D. (2006). Effects of phosphatidylserine on exercise capacity during cycling in active males. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 38(1), 64-71.
2. Starks, M. A., Starks, S. L., Kingsley, M., Purpura, M., & Jäger, R. (2008). The effects of phosphatidylserine on endocrine response to moderate intensity exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition,5(1), 1-6.
3. Carter, J., & Greenwood, M. (2015). Phosphatidylserine for the Athlete.Strength & Conditioning Journal, 37(1), 61-68.
4. Kingsley, M. (2006). Effects of phosphatidylserine supplementation on exercising humans. Sports medicine, 36(8), 657-669.

Advantra Z:
1. Lopez, H. L., Ziegenfuss, T. N., Hofheins, J. E., Habowski, S. M., Arent, S. M., Weir, J. P., & Ferrando, A. A. (2013). Eight weeks of supplementation with a multi-ingredient weight loss product enhances body composition, reduces hip and waist girth, and increases energy levels in overweight men and women. J Int Soc. Sports Nutr, 10(1), 22.
2. Stohs, S. J., & Preuss, H. G. (2012). Stereochemical and pharmacological differences between naturally occurring p-synephrine and synthetic p-synephrine. Journal of Functional Foods, 4(1), 2-5
3. Seifert, J. G., Nelson, A., Devonish, J., Burke, E. R., & Stohs, S. J. (2011). Effect of acute administration of an herbal preparation on blood pressure and heart rate in humans. Int J Med Sci, 8(3), 192-197.
4. Haller, C. A., Duan, M., Jacob, P., & Benowitz, N. (2008). Human pharmacology of a performance‐enhancing dietary supplement under resting and exercise conditions. British journal of clinical pharmacology, 65(6), 833-840.
5. Sale, C., Harris, R. C., Delves, S., & Corbett, J. (2006). Metabolic and physiological effects of ingesting extracts of bitter orange, green tea and guarana at rest and during treadmill walking in overweight males.International Journal of Obesity, 30(5), 764-773.

Halostachine:
1. Yao, X., Parnot, C., Deupi, X., Ratnala, V. R., Swaminath, G., Farrens, D., & Kobilka, B. (2006). Coupling ligand structure to specific conformational switches in the β2-adrenoceptor. Nature chemical biology, 2(8), 417-422.
2. Shannon, H. E., Cone, E. J., & Yousefnejad, D. A. V. I. D. (1982). Physiologic effects and plasma kinetics of beta-phenylethylamine and its N-methyl homolog in the dog. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 223(1), 190-196.
3. Aasen, A. J., Culvenor, C. C. J., Finnie, E. P., Kellock, A. W., & Smith, L. W. (1969). Alkaloids as a possible cause of ryegrass staggers in grazing livestock. Crop and Pasture Science, 20(1), 71-86.
4. Liapakis, G., Chan, W. C., Papadokostaki, M., & Javitch, J. A. (2004). Synergistic contributions of the functional groups of epinephrine to its affinity and efficacy at the β2 adrenergic receptor. Molecular pharmacology, 65(5), 1181-1190.
5. Osamu, S., Masakazu, O., & Yoshinao, K. (1980). Characterization of N-methylphenylethylamine and N-methylphenylethanolamine as substrates for type A and type B monoamine oxidase. Biochemical pharmacology, 29(19), 2563-2566.

Synephrine:
1. Stohs, S. J., et al. Effects of p-synephrine alone and in combination with selected bioflavonoids on resting metabolism, blood pressure, heart rate and self-reported mood changes. Int J Med Sci. 8(4):295-301, 2011.
2. Stohs, S. J., et al. A review of the human clinical studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine. Int J Med Sci. 9(7):527-38, 2012.
3. Sale, C., et al. Metabolic and physiological effects of ingesting extracts of bitter orange, green tea and guarana at rest and during treadmill walking in overweight males. International Journal of Obesity 1:10, 2006.
4. Gougeon, R., et al. Increase in the thermic effect of food by adrenergic amines extracted from Citrus aurantium. Obesity Research 13(7):1187-94, 2005.
5. Zenk, J. L., et al. Effect of multi-ingredient weight-loss product on metabolic rate and body composition. Nutrition 21:179-185, 2005.
6. Preuss, H. G., et al. Citrus aurantium as a thermogenic, weight reduction replacement for ephedra: An overview. Journal of Medicine 33:1-4, 2002.
7. Stohs, S. J., et al. A review of the receptor-binding properties of p-synephrine as related to its pharmacological effects. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2001.
8. Stohs, S. J., et al. The safety of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine. Phytotherapy Research, 2011.
9. Kaats, G.R. et al. A 60day double-blind, placebo controlled safety study involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract. Food and Chemical Toxicology 55:358-362, 2013.
10. Seifert, J. G., et al. Effect of acute administration of an herbal preparation on blood pressure and heart rate in humans. International Journal of Medical Sciences 8(3):192-197, 2011.
11. Stohs, S. J. and Preuss, H. G. Stereochemical and physiological differences between naturally occurring p-synephrine and synthetic p-synephrine. Journal of Functional Foods 4:2-5, 2012.

Yohimbe HCL:
1. Ostojic, S. M. (2006). Yohimbine: the effects on body composition and exercise performance in soccer players. Research in Sports Medicine, 14(4), 289-299.
2. Ernst, E., & Pittler, M. H. (1998). Yohimbine for erectile dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. The Journal of urology, 159(2), 433-436.

CapsiAtra™ (Dihydrocapsiate):
1. Galgani, J. E., & Ravussin, E. (2010). Effect of dihydrocapsiate on resting metabolic rate in humans. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 92(5), 1089-1093.
2. Lee, T. A., Li, Z., Zerlin, A., & Heber, D. (2010). Effects of dihydrocapsiate on adaptive and diet-induced thermogenesis with a high protein very low calorie diet: a randomized control trial. Nutrition & metabolism, 7(1), 1.
3. Galgani, J. E., Ryan, D. H., & Ravussin, E. (2010). Effect of capsinoids on energy metabolism in human subjects. British journal of nutrition, 103(01), 38-42.
4. Inoue, N., Matsunaga, Y., Satoh, H., & Takahashi, M. (2007). Enhanced energy expenditure and fat oxidation in humans with high BMI scores by the ingestion of novel and non-pungent capsaicin analogues (capsinoids). Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry, 71(2), 380-389.

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Warning

While not illegal, some of the ingredients found in this product could lead to a false positive drug test and may also be banned by WADA or other professional organizations such as the NCAA. If you are a professional, college, or amateur athlete whose given sports conduct in and out of competition random drug screens is it highly recommended you check with the appropriate person before taking this product.