CardioBurn For Her

$49.99

SUPER POTENT THERMOGENIC*

  • – Thermogenic, fat burning formula designed specifically for women*
  • – Massively ramps up metabolism to speed the fat-burning process*
  • – Encourages the release of body fat stores to be used as energy*
  • – BCAAs to help build & maintain lean muscle mass*
  • – No cold sweats, loss of focus, or shakiness from over stimulation*
  • – Delicious flavors

 

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Description

Have you ever wanted a thermogenic that is SPECIFICALLY formulated for women?

Well wait no more. CARDIOBURN for HER is a specially formulated thermogenic fat burner that simply delivers. No cold sweats, no loss of focus from over stimulation, and no shakiness. Just pure, fat-incinerating effects. CARDIOBURN for HER was designed to take the guesswork out of supplementing for women, without compromising on efficacy. Here’s how we did it:

L-Carnitine Tartrate and Glycocarn – Without Carnitine, fats cannot be metabolized, so CARDIOBURN uses 2 specialized forms of Carnitine to escort body fats to the mitochondria to be broken down.
Caffeine Anhydrous – Massively ramps up metabolism to speed the fat-burning process while also releasing epinephrine to enhance focus and release body fat stores.
Choline Bitartrate – An essential precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is required for muscle contractions and synaptic transmission.
Coumabuterol Matrix – 3 key ingredients work together for a comprehensive profile of adrenergic stimulation.
Branched-Chain Amino Acids – Helps create a lean and toned physique by preventing the loss of muscle tissue that can occur during cardio sessions.

CARDIOBURN for HER will help increase your energy and focus, control your appetite, and metabolize fat. Not all supplements are created equal. Even fewer are formulated with women in mind. Now, you can have the elite quality of a superior supplement combined with the peace-of-mind knowing it was formulated just FOR HER!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Ingredient Profile

FAT INCINERATION MATRIX

L-Carnitine Tartrate:

L-Carnitine is an amino acid that is derived from lysine and methionine and is essential for transporting long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria for subsequent fat breakdown and energy production.

  • L-Carnitine has also been shown to reduce exercise-induced muscle damage, muscular fatigue, and reduce soreness.
  • A study conducted by Volek et al. (2002) found that supplementation with L-Carnitine daily for one week in healthy resistance trained men was able to reduce markers of muscle damage after weight lifting. It was also discovered that biomarkers of oxidative damage reduced to baseline sooner than placebo.
  • Ho et al. (2010) discovered that middle aged males and females who supplemented with L-Carnitine over a 24-day period experienced less muscle damage and soreness following exercise and had less oxidative markers in serum after exercise.

Glycocarn:

Glycocarn is a highly bioavailable form of Carnitine. Carnitine is crucial in muscle function by regulating energy flow across the cell membranes during strenuous activity.

  • Glycocarn can help increase nitric oxide levels. Increasing Nitric Oxide helps blood flow to organs and muscles and optimizes oxygen and nutrient delivery to the muscles.
  • All this can help to increase aerobic power, stamina, endurance, and recovery.
  • Jacobs et al. (2009) discovered that resistance trained males who supplemented with Glycocarn 90 minutes before exercise were able to increase peak power production (2-15%) and decrease lactic acid accumulation (15-17%).

Pantethine:

Pantethine is used in the synthesis of Coenzyme A. Coenzyme A is particularly involved in the making of ATP (energy) from sugars, fats and some proteins (as acetyl CoA). It is also involved in many other biological roles.

CoQ10:

Coenzyme Q-10 is produced by the human body and is necessary for the basic functioning of cells.

  • CoQ10 plays a critical role in producing energy (ATP) for the body.
  • CoQ10 can also enhance blood flow and protect the blood vessels.
  • CoQ10 can reduce the damage oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (LDL) can do to blood vessels, as well as reduce plaque buildup in the arteries.
  • CoQ10 may able to reduce exercise induced muscle damage. Kon et al. (2008) found individuals supplementing with CoQ10 daily were able to reduce muscular damage associated with exercise and reduce increases in injury related biomarkers (creatine kinase, myoglobin, leukocytes.

ENERGY AND FOCUS MATRIX

Caffeine Anhydrous:

Caffeine Anhydrous is simply caffeine with no water (around .05%). This has been shown to make caffeine anhydrous more potent because the body will absorb it more readily.

  • Although caffeine can affect a wide variety of motor and mental functions it is most commonly used to improve endurance exercise, focus and cognitive performance, and improve energy levels.
  • Caffeine has also been shown to have a thermogenic effect (heating/calorie burning) at rest and may increase the use of fats for fuel during exercise.
  • According to the research higher doses of caffeine, in the 250-450mg range, are needed to provide an ergogenic benefit.
  • In a study conducted by Astorino et al. (2010), active men given caffeine before resistance training were able to increase maximal torque, power, and volume by 5-8%.

Green Coffee Bean Extract:

Green coffee extract is a supplement derived from green coffee beans. It is a concentrated source of chlorogenic acid, a compound that may be able to reduce blood sugar and have an anti-diabetic effect.

  • Green coffee bean extract may also be a potent weight loss and anti-obesity supplement.
  • Thom (2007) discovered individuals who consumed green coffee extract over a period of 12 week experienced greater weight lose compared to a placebo group.

Choline Bitartrate:

Choline is an essential nutrient for brain health and synaptic plasticity.

  • Choline improves structural integrity, signaling capacity and the fluidity of neural membranes. It’s estimated that close to 90% of the population does not get the recommended amount of choline daily.
  • It has been shown that a dose of 500mg of Choline can boost focus, mood and concentration abilities.
  • This is tantamount to pushing through your workout. Utilizing this effectively dosed compound, you will be able to focus on taking less rest or being distracted during you training. Giving your 110% will really be your 110%.
  • A study conducted by Sun et al. (1999) reported that subjects who supplemented with choline for 4 weeks improved learning performance and memory compared to a placebo group.

COUMABUTEROL MATRIX

Coumabuterol Complex (Norcoclaurine HCL, N-Coumaroyldopamine, N-Caffeoyldopamine):

This complex is combined with three of the most known and effective beta-1 and beta-2 adrenergic agonists.

  • These agonists will boost your heart rate, create laser focus, and help utilize body fat from energy expended during your training.

Halostachine:

Halostachine shares similarities with beta adrenergic receptor agonists. This means Halostachine will stimulate the beta receptors which are found on fat cells. This stimulation causes the fat to be burned as energy.

  • In an en vitro study of the pharmacodynamics and Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) of various epinephrine-like compounds, halostachine was demonstrated to be 19% as effective as epinephrine in activating beta2 receptors.

Rauwolscine:

Rauwolscine is an ingredient very similar in structure and effect to Yohimbe  but may be more potent.

  • Rauwolscine can act as an Alpha(2)Adrenergic antagonist and thus aid in fat burning.
  • It also shares the same stimulating and mood-elevating effects as yohimbe.

ANTI-CATABOLIC MATRIX

BCAAs:

The essential amino acids Leucine, Isoleucine, and Valine collectively form what is referred to as the Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs). These amino acids are essential because they cannot be produced in the body and must be provided though supplementation or diet. BCAAs comprise approximately 30% of the total muscle protein pool and are the primary amino acids oxidized in the muscle during exercise and catabolic stress.  For these reasons athletes supplement with BCAAs for the purpose of increasing muscle mass, reducing muscle damage, blunting fatigue, and increasing energy during exercise.

  • Hundreds of studies exist on the ergogenic benefits of BCAAs.  The majority of them show that BCAAs, whether consumed pre, during, or post-exercise; decrease protein catabolism (breakdown) and support muscle protein synthesis…a physiological process responsible for muscle growth and repair.  Furthermore, BCAAs are vitally important to glucose (energy) production; contributing to greater than 40% of glucose production during sustained endurance exercise.
  • A study done in 2009 found that subjects who supplemented with BCAAs while following an 8-week resistance training program had a greater decrease in body fat, an increase in lean mass, and greater strength gains on the bench press and squat compared to the non-BCAA group.

Glutamine & L-Alanyl L-Glutamine:

L-glutamine is the most prevalent free amino acid in plasma and one of the most prevalent found in muscle tissue.

  • L-Glutamine stimulates muscle protein synthesis and is effective at replenishing energy for muscles (glycogen) after exhaustive exercise which may lead to quicker recovery.
  • L-Glutamine may also increase cell volumization (hydration) and lead to increases in muscle hypertrophy.
  • L-Glutamine may also reduce protein breakdown and support immune function.
  • Lehmkuhl et al. (2003) found individual supplementing with glutamine and creatine monohydrate for 8 weeks increased body mass, lean body mass and initial rate of power production compared to placebo.

DL-a-hydroxy-isocaproic acid (HICA):

HICA is short for DL-Alpha-Hydroxy-Isocaproic Acidand is the end result of leucine metabolism in human tissues.

  • Studies have shown that HICA can enhance anaerobic and aerobic performance as well as help to promote optimal gains in muscle mass and muscle fiber size.
  • However, the biggest benefit of HICA can be the reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).
  • Mero et. al (2010) discovered male soccer players who supplemented with HICA over a 4 week period were able to increase whole lean body mass and reduce soreness by 23% compared to placebo.
FAQs

Q: What is the best way to take CardioBurn for Her?
A: Mix 1 Scoop (8g) with 12oz of water 15 minutes prior to cardiovascular activity.
As a pre-workout for weight training, consume with NX5 for best results.

Q: What is a thermogenic?
A: A thermogenic is any substance or ingredient that causes heat production…in this case in the body. Increased heat production can increase metabolism and the number of calories burned at rest or during exercise.

Q: What other MuscleSport products do you recommend stacking with CardioBurn for Her?
A: For weight/fat loss goals we recommend stacking CardioBurn for Her with Detox and LipoSlim for Her.

References

L-Carnitine Tartrate:
1. Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., French, D. N., Rubin, M. R., Sharman, M. J., Gómez, A. L., … & Hakkinen, K. (2003). The effects of L-carnitine L-tartrate supplementation on hormonal responses to resistance exercise and recovery. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 17(3), 455-462.
2. Spiering, B. A., Kraemer, W. J., Vingren, J. L., Hatfield, D. L., Fragala, M. S., Ho, J. Y., … & Volek, J. S. (2007). Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 21(1), 259-264.
3. Ho, J. Y., Kraemer, W. J., Volek, J. S., Fragala, M. S., Thomas, G. A., Dunn-Lewis, C., … & Maresh, C. M. (2010). l-Carnitine l-tartrate supplementation favorably affects biochemical markers of recovery from physical exertion in middle-aged men and women. Metabolism, 59(8), 1190-1199.
4. Broad, E. M., Maughan, R. J., & Galloway, S. D. (2008). Carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism during exercise after oral carnitine supplementation in humans.
5. Dehghani, M., Shakerian, S., Nejad, S. H., & Gharib-Naseri, M. K. (2015). Effects of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate Acute Consumption on Lipid Metabolism, Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), and distance run Following Aerobic Exhaustive Exercise on Treadmill in Elite Athletes wrestling. The AYER, 2, 189-195.

GlycoCarn:
1. Long-term glycine propionyl-l-carnitine supplemention and paradoxical effects on repeated anaerobic sprint performance. Jacobs PL, Goldstein ER. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2010 Oct 28;7:35. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-7-35.
2. Glycine propionyl-L-carnitine modulates lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide in human subjects. Bloomer RJ, Tschume LC, Smith WA. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2009 May;79(3):131-41. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831.79.3.131.

Patethine:
1. Brown, G. M. (1959). The metabolism of pantothenic acid. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 234, 370-378.
2. Novelli, G. D., & Lipmann, F. (1950). The catalytic function of coenzyme A in citric acid synthesis. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 182(1), 213-228.

CoQ10:
1. Lee, B. J., Huang, Y. C., Chen, S. J., & Lin, P. T. (2012). Coenzyme Q10 supplementation reduces oxidative stress and increases antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with coronary artery disease. Nutrition, 28(3), 250-255.
2. Dai, Y. L., Luk, T. H., Yiu, K. H., Wang, M., Yip, P. M., Lee, S. W., … & Siu, C. W. (2011). Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by coenzyme Q10 supplement improves endothelial function in patients with ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.Atherosclerosis, 216(2), 395-401.
3. Smith-Ryan, A., & Antonio, J. (Eds.). (2013). Sports Nutrition & Performance Enhancing Supplements. Linus Learning.

Caffeine Anhydrous:
1. Harland, B. F. (2000). Caffeine and nutrition. Nutrition, 16(7), 522-526.
2. Goldstein, E. R., Ziegenfuss, T., Kalman, D., Kreider, R., Campbell, B., Wilborn, C., … & Wildman, R. (2010). International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 5.
3. Spriet, L. L. (1995). Caffeine and performance. International journal of sport nutrition, 5, S84-S84.
4. Astrup, A., Toubro, S., Cannon, S., Hein, P., Breum, L., & Madsen, J. (1990). Caffeine: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of its thermogenic, metabolic, and cardiovascular effects in healthy volunteers. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 51(5), 759-767.
5. Hogervorst, E., Bandelow, S., Schmitt, J. A., Jentjens, R., Oliveira, M., Allgrove, J. E., … & Gleeson, M. (2008). Caffeine improves physical and cognitive performance during exhaustive exercise.
6. Woolf, K., Bidwell, W. K., & Carlson, A. G. (2008). The effect of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in anaerobic exercise. International journal of sport nutrition,18(4), 412.
7. Stuart, G. R., Hopkins, W. G., Cook, C., & Cairns, S. P. (2005). Multiple effects of caffeine on simulated high-intensity team-sport performance. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 37(11), 1998.
8. Beck, T. W., Housh, T. J., Schmidt, R. J., Johnson, G. O., Housh, D. J., Coburn, J. W., & Malek, M. H. (2006). The acute effects of a caffeine-containing supplement on strength, muscular endurance, and anaerobic capabilities. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 20(3), 506-510.
9. McLellan, T. M., Kamimori, G. H., Voss, D. M., Tate, C., & Smith, S. J. (2007). Caffeine effects on physical and cognitive performance during sustained operations. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine, 78(9), 871-877.
10. Lieberman, H. R., Tharion, W. J., Shukitt-Hale, B., Speckman, K. L., & Tulley, R. (2002). Effects of caffeine, sleep loss, and stress on cognitive performance and mood during US Navy SEAL training. Psychopharmacology, 164(3), 250-261.
11. Costill, D. L., Dalsky, G. P., & Fink, W. J. (1977). Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance. Medicine and science in sports, 10(3), 155-158.
12. Kovacs, E. M., Stegen, J. H., & Brouns, F. (1998). Effect of caffeinated drinks on substrate metabolism, caffeine excretion, and Performance. Journal of Applied physiology, 85(2), 709-715.
13. Acheson, K. J., Zahorska-Markiewicz, B., Pittet, P., Anantharaman, K., & Jéquier, E. (1980). Caffeine and coffee: their influence on metabolic rate and substrate utilization in normal weight and obese individuals. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 33(5), 989-997.
14. Dulloo, A. G., Geissler, C. A., Horton, T., Collins, A., & Miller, D. S. (1989). Normal caffeine consumption: influence on thermogenesis and daily energy expenditure in lean and postobese human volunteers. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 49(1), 44-50.

Green Coffee Bean Extract:
1. Taylor, L. W., Wilborn, C. D., Harvey, T., Wismann, J., & Willoughby, D. S. (2007). Acute effects of ingesting Java Fit™ energy extreme functional coffee on resting energy expenditure and hemodynamic responses in male and female coffee drinkers. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 4(1), 1-9.
2. Shimoda, H., Seki, E., & Aitani, M. (2006). Inhibitory effect of green coffee bean extract on fat accumulation and body weight gain in mice. BMC complementary and alternative medicine, 6(1), 1.
3. Burke, A., Catalano, P., Lal, S. K., Maniam, P., & Tojino, C. Green Coffee Bean Extract.
4. Watanabe, T., Arai, Y., Mitsui, Y., Kusaura, T., Okawa, W., Kajihara, Y., & Saito, I. (2006). The blood pressure-lowering effect and safety of chlorogenic acid from green coffee bean extract in essential hypertension. Clinical and experimental hypertension, 28(5), 439-449.
5. Onakpoya, I., Terry, R., & Ernst, E. (2010). The use of green coffee extract as a weight loss supplement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. Gastroenterology research and practice, 2011.

Choline:
1. Moreno, H., de Brugada, I., & Hall, G. (2013). Chronic dietary choline supplementation modulates attentional change in adult rats. Behavioural brain research, 243, 278-285.
2. Blusztajn, J. K., & Mellott, T. J. (2013). Neuroprotective actions of perinatal choline nutrition. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 51(3), 591-599.
3. Krzysztof Blusztajn, J., & J Mellott, T. (2012). Choline nutrition programs brain development via DNA and histone methylation. Central Nervous System Agents in Medicinal Chemistry (Formerly Current Medicinal Chemistry-Central Nervous System Agents), 12(2), 82-94.
4. Biasi, E. (2011). The effects of dietary choline. Neuroscience bulletin, 27(5), 330-342.

Coumabuterol Complex:
1. Bai, G., Yang, Y., Shi, Q., Liu, Z., & Zhang, Q. (2008). Identification of higenamine in Radix Aconiti Lateralis Preparata as a beta2‐adrenergic receptor agonist1. Acta Pharmacologica Sinica, 29(10), 1187-1194.
2. Kam, S. C., Do, J. M., Choi, J. H., Jeon, B. T., Roh, G. S., Chang, K. C., & Hyun, J. S. (2012). The relaxation effect and mechanism of action of higenamine in the rat corpus cavernosum. International journal of impotence research, 24(2), 77-83.
3. Tsukiyama, M., Ueki, T., Yasuda, Y., Kikuchi, H., Akaishi, T., Okumura, H., & Abe, K. (2009). Beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated tracheal relaxation induced by higenamine from Nandina domestica Thunberg. Planta medica, 75(13), 1393-1399.
4. Zhou, S. J., & Du, G. Y. (2003). [Effects of higenamine on the cardio-circulatory system]. Zhongguo Zhong yao za zhi= Zhongguo zhongyao zazhi= China journal of Chinese materia medica, 28(10), 910-913.
5. Kang, Y. J., Lee, Y. S., Lee, G. W., Lee, D. H., Ryu, J. C., Yun-Choi, H. S., & Chang, K. C. (1999). Inhibition of activation of nuclear factor κB is responsible for inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by higenamine, an active component of aconite root. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 291(1), 314-320.
6. Pyo, M. K., Lee, D. H., Kim, D. H., Lee, J. H., Moon, J. C., Chang, K. C., & Yun-Choi, H. S. (2008). Enantioselective synthesis of (R)-(+)-and (S)-(−)-higenamine and their analogues with effects on platelet aggregation and experimental animal model of disseminated intravascular coagulation.Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters, 18(14), 4110-4114.
7. Park, J. B. (2005). N-coumaroyldopamine and N-caffeoyldopamine increase cAMP via beta 2-adrenoceptors in myelocytic U937 cells. The FASEB journal, 19(6), 497-502.
8. Park, J. B. (2005). N-coumaroyldopamine and N-caffeoyldopamine increase cAMP via beta 2-adrenoceptors in myelocytic U937 cells. The FASEB journal, 19(6), 497-502.

Halostachine:
1. Yao, X., Parnot, C., Deupi, X., Ratnala, V. R., Swaminath, G., Farrens, D., & Kobilka, B. (2006). Coupling ligand structure to specific conformational switches in the β2-adrenoceptor. Nature chemical biology, 2(8), 417-422.
2. Shannon, H. E., Cone, E. J., & Yousefnejad, D. A. V. I. D. (1982). Physiologic effects and plasma kinetics of beta-phenylethylamine and its N-methyl homolog in the dog. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 223(1), 190-196.
3. Aasen, A. J., Culvenor, C. C. J., Finnie, E. P., Kellock, A. W., & Smith, L. W. (1969). Alkaloids as a possible cause of ryegrass staggers in grazing livestock. Crop and Pasture Science, 20(1), 71-86.
4. Liapakis, G., Chan, W. C., Papadokostaki, M., & Javitch, J. A. (2004). Synergistic contributions of the functional groups of epinephrine to its affinity and efficacy at the β2 adrenergic receptor. Molecular pharmacology, 65(5), 1181-1190.
5. Osamu, S., Masakazu, O., & Yoshinao, K. (1980). Characterization of N-methylphenylethylamine and N-methylphenylethanolamine as substrates for type A and type B monoamine oxidase. Biochemical pharmacology, 29(19), 2563-2566.

Rauwolscine:
1. Perry, B. D., & U’Prichard, D. C. (1981). [3 H] Rauwolscine (α-yohimbine): A specific antagonist radioligand for brain α 2-adrenergic receptors. European journal of pharmacology, 76(4), 461-464.
2. Rockhold, R. W., & Gross, F. (1981). Yohimbine diastereoisomers: Cardiovascular effects after central and peripheral application in the rat.Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s archives of pharmacology, 315(3), 227-231.
3. Arthur, J. M., Casańas, S. J., & Raymond, J. R. (1993). Partial agonist properties of rauwolscine and yohimbine for the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by recombinant human 5-HT 1A receptors. Biochemical pharmacology,45(11), 2337-2341.
4. Wainscott, D. B., Sasso, D. A., Kursar, J. D., Baez, M., Lucaites, V. L., & Nelson, D. L. (1997). [3H] Rauwolscine: an antagonist radioligand for the cloned human 5-hydroxytryptamine2B (5-HT2B) receptor. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s archives of pharmacology, 357(1), 17-24.

BCAAs
1. Norton, L. E., & Layman, D. K. (2006). Leucine regulates translation initiation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle after exercise. The Journal of nutrition, 136(2), 533S-537S.
2. Shimomura, Y., Inaguma, A., Watanabe, S., Yamamoto, Y., Muramatsu, Y., Bajotto, G., … & Mawatari, K. (2010). Branched-chain amino acid supplementation before squat exercise and delayed-onset muscle soreness. International journal of sport nutrition, 20(3), 236.
3. Gualano, A. B., Bozza, T., Lopes, D. C. P., Roschel, H., Dos Santos, C. A., Luiz, M. M., … & Herbert, L. J. A. (2011). Branched-chain amino acids supplementation enhances exercise capacity and lipid oxidation during endurance exercise after muscle glycogen depletion. The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness, 51(1), 82-88.
4. Hamel, F. G., Upward, J. L., Siford, G. L., & Duckworth, W. C. (2003). Inhibition of proteasome activity by selected amino acids. Metabolism, 52(7), 805-809.
5. Nicastro, H., Artioli, G. G., dos Santos Costa, A., Solis, M. Y., Da Luz, C. R., Blachier, F., & Lancha Jr, A. H. (2011). An overview of the therapeutic effects of leucine supplementation on skeletal muscle under atrophic conditions. Amino Acids, 40(2), 287-300.
6. Ra, S. G., Miyazaki, T., Ishikura, K., Nagayama, H., Suzuki, T., Maeda, S., … & Ohmori, H. (2013). Additional effects of taurine on the benefits of BCAA intake for the delayed-onset muscle soreness and muscle damage induced by high-intensity eccentric exercise. In Taurine 8 (pp. 179-187). Springer New York.
7. Stoppani, J., Scheett, T. P., Pena, J., Rudolph, C., Charlebois, D., & Charleston, S. C. (2009). Consuming branched-chain amino acid supplement during a resistance training program increases lean mass, muscle strength and fat loss. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 6(Suppl 1), P1.

Glutamine:
1. Welbourne, T. C. (1995). “Increased plasma bicarbonate and growth hormone after an oral glutamine load”. The American journal of clinical nutrition 61 (5): 1058–1061.
2. Morlion, B. J.; Stehle, P.; Wachtler, P.; Siedhoff, H. P.; Köller, M.; König, W.; Fürst, P.; Puchstein, C. (1998). “Total Parenteral Nutrition with Glutamine Dipeptide After Major Abdominal Surgery”. Annals of Surgery 227 (2): 302–308.
3. Lee, W. J.; Hawkins, R. A.; Viña, J. R.; Peterson, D. R. (1998). “Glutamine transport by the blood-brain barrier: A possible mechanism for nitrogen removal”. The American journal of physiology 274
4. Todorova, V. K., Kaufmann, Y., Luo, S., & Klimberg, V. S. (2011). Tamoxifen and raloxifene suppress the proliferation of estrogen receptor-negative cells through inhibition of glutamine uptake. [Research Support, U.S. Gov’t, Non-P.H.S.]. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol, 67(2), 285-291.
5. Bowtell, J. L., Gelly, K., Jackman, M. L., Patel, A., Simeoni, M., & Rennie, M. J. (1999). Effect of oral glutamine on whole body carbohydrate storage during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology,86(6), 1770-1777.

HICA:
1. Mero, A. A., Ojala, T., Hulmi, J. J., Puurtinen, R., Karila, T. A., & Seppälä, T. (2010). Effects of alfa-hydroxy-isocaproic acid on body composition, DOMS and performance in athletes. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 8.
2. Mero, A. A., Ojala, T., Hulmi, J. J., Puurtinen, R., Karila, T. A., & Seppälä, T. (2010). Effects of alfa-hydroxy-isocaproic acid on body composition, DOMS and performance in athletes. J Int Soc Sports Nutr, 7(1), 8.
3. Tischler, M. E., Desautels, M., & Goldberg, A. L. (1982). Does leucine, leucyl-tRNA, or some metabolite of leucine regulate protein synthesis and degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscle. J Biol Chem, 257(4), 1613-1621.
4. Jakobs, C., Sweetman, L., & Nyhan, W. L. (1984). Hydroxy acid metabolites of branched-chain amino acids in amniotic fluid. Clinica chimica acta, 140(2), 157-166.

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