Adrenal Revolution™

$59.99

FULL ADRENAL SUPPORT*

  • – Combats adrenal fatigue caused stimulants, dieting, & lack of sleep*
  • – Helps the body deal with physical, emotional, and psychological stressors*
  • – May reduce cortisol levels and offer neuroprotective effects*
  • – Supports the neurological mechanisms of dealing with stress*
  • – May enhance overall mood*

 

SKU: 1139 Category:
Description

The health of your adrenal glands are absolutely vital to your well-being and overall performance. They play a huge role in producing the hormones we need, particularly during times of stress. Rigorous training and cardiovascular activity tends to strain the adrenal glands and may prevent them from functioning optimally. Add in the effects of dieting, not enough water or sleep, caffeine, the stimulants found in pre-workouts and adrenal function may be impaired further…leaving your weight loss at a standstill and shooting your cortisol levels through the roof.
Because strong adrenal support is key for athletes on multiple levels, MuscleSport developed Adrenal Revolution; a full adrenal support formula that can help reduce adrenal fatigue, minimize stress, and decrease stimulant tolerance. We accomplished this by using a few key ingredients such as:

Ashwagandha Root – An adaptogen, that helps the body deal with physical, emotional, and psychological stressors.
Vitamin C– A powerful antioxidant that may also reduce cortisol levels and offer neuroprotective effects.
Rhodiola Rosea Root Extract – Supports the neurological mechanisms of dealing with stress.
Tyrosine – A direct precursor to thyroxine and to the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine; Tyrosine may lower stress levels and improve overall mood.

The effects of adrenal fatigue can be disastrous if ignored. High levels of fatigue, a weakened immune system, and depressed hormone production can put a serious damper on your fitness goals. Adrenal Revolution will help reset your adrenal system and have you performing at your best.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Ingredient Profile

Ashwagandha Root:

Ashwagandha is classified as an adaptogen, meaning it helps the body deal with physical, emotional, and psychological stressors.

  • It also shows promise for relieving insomnia and stress-induced bouts of depression.
  • Ashwagandha is able to to mitigate stress and anxiety by reducing cortisol concentrations and the immunosuppressive effect of stress in the body.
  • Ashwagandha can improve the formation of memories, and may be able to treat Alzheimer’s disease due to its ability to prevent the degradation of brain cells, making the herb a neuroprotectant.
  • In a study conducted by Andrade et al. (2000), six weeks supplementation of Ashwagandha in persons with diagnosed generalized anxiety disorder (mixed anxiety and depression) noted significant improvements in both depression and anxiety symptoms.

Vitamin C:

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water soluble essential vitamin and powerful anti-oxidant.

  • Vitamin C may also reduce cortisol levels, offer neuroprotective effects, and reduce bio-markers of muscle damage.
  • Additionally, Vitamin C can provide neuroprotective effects and help preserve testosterone levels.
  • Vitamin C also helps the body manufacture collagen, a key protein in our connective tissues, cartilage, and tendons.
  • What is lesser known is that vitamin C can increase blood flow via reducing the oxidation of nitric oxide.
  • Roohi et al. (2008) found vitamin C before exercise (30 minutes aerobic exercise at 75% VO2 max) was able to reduce oxidation during exercise and markers of muscle damage.

Magnesium Aspartate:

Magnesium is an essential mineral and electrolyte. It is involved in protein synthesis, ATP formation, metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, and bone strength.

  • Magnesium deficiencies are the second most common deficiency in developed countries. A lack of magnesium will raise blood pressure and reduce insulin sensitivity.
  • Increases in free and total testosterone have been noted in sedentary and athletic populations when supplementing with magnesium supplementation. It also acts as a muscle relaxer and may improve aerobic performance.
  • Brilla et al. (1992) discovered 26 untrained subjects who participated in a 7 week strength training program in conjunction with magnesium supplementation were able to increase testosterone relative to baseline.

Rhodiola Rosea Root Extract:

Rhodiola rosea root extract has a wide range of adaptogenic functions, which means it may help deal with stress and the unwanted effects on the body.

  • One way that Rhodiola may help is by supporting the neurological mechanisms of dealing with stress.
  • It may also reduce fatigue and exhaustion in prolonged stressful situations.
  • Research suggests Rhodiola can have a positive effect on cognition, feelings of well-being, and decrease symptoms of depression.
  • A study conducted by Edwards et al. (2012) found rhodiola extract twice daily for 4 weeks in persons with life and work-related stress was greatly able to reduce dysfunction and fatigue associated with stress in a time-dependent manner.

Holy Basil Extract:

Holy Basil is an ayurvetic herb which has historically been used to treat a variety of general ailments.

  • It recently has been shown to hold scientific worth in the areas of liver protection and general anti-oxidant activity, as well as being classified as an adaptogen (reducing the effects of stress on the body).
  • Bhattacharyya et al. (2008) found holy basil extract was able to reduce anxiety and its related depression/stress over 60 days of supplementation in a population of persons with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

Tyrosine:

Tyrosine’s primary role in the body is as the direct precursor to thyroxine and to the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine.

  • Dopamine is often associated with the reward center’ of the brain which means when high levels of it are present, you will most likely experience a sensation of joy, happiness or positive reinforcement.
  • Tyrosine is actually less bioavailable in the body during times of heightened stress. If you’re constantly worried or experiencing bouts of anxiety, supplementing with Tyrosine may be beneficial to lowering your stress levels and improving your overall mood.
  • Relative to placebo, Banderet et al. (1989) found L-Tyrosine was associated with significant improvements in mood, cognitive function, and side-effects associated with acute stressors (cold and altitude) in military personnel.
FAQs

Q: What is the best way to take Adrenal Revolution?
A: Take one serving (3 capsules) with food.

Q: What is the main role of the adrenal gland in the body?
A: The adrenal glands produce hormones that help the body control blood sugar, burn protein and fat, react to stressors like a major illness or injury, and regulate blood pressure

Q: What other MuscleSport products do you recommend stacking with Adrenal Revolution?
A: We recommend stacking Adrenal Revolution with any of our pre-workouts; especially is you feel like you have built up a tolerance to caffeine or other stimulants.

References

Ashwagandha Root:
1. Andrade, C., Aswath, A., Chaturvedi, S. K., Srinivasa, M., & Raguram, R. (2000). A double-blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of the anxiolytic efficacy ff an ethanolic extract of withania somnifera. Indian journal of psychiatry, 42(3), 295.
2. Chandrasekhar, K., Kapoor, J., & Anishetty, S. (2012). A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy of a high-concentration full-spectrum extract of ashwagandha root in reducing stress and anxiety in adults. Indian journal of psychological medicine, 34(3), 255.
3. Cooley, K., Szczurko, O., Perri, D., Mills, E. J., Bernhardt, B., Zhou, Q., & Seely, D. (2009). Naturopathic care for anxiety: a randomized controlled trial ISRCTN78958974. PLoS One, 4(8), e6628.

Vitamin C:
1. De Marchi, S., Prior, M., Rigoni, A., Zecchetto, S., Rulfo, F., & Arosio, E. (2012). Ascorbic acid prevents vascular dysfunction induced by oral glucose load in healthy subjects. European journal of internal medicine, 23(1), 54-57.
2. Stewart, J. M., Ocon, A. J., & Medow, M. S. (2011). Ascorbate improves circulation in postural tachycardia syndrome. American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 301(3), H1033-H1042.
3. Fernandes, P. R. O. F., Lira, F. A. D. S., Borba, V. V. L., Costa, M. J. C., Trombeta, I. C., Santos, M. D. S. B., & Santos, A. D. C. (2011). Vitamin C restores blood pressure and vasodilator response during mental stress in obese children. Arquivos brasileiros de cardiologia, 96(6), 490-497.
4. Fernandes, P. R. O. F., Lira, F. A. D. S., Borba, V. V. L., Costa, M. J. C., Trombeta, I. C., Santos, M. D. S. B., & Santos, A. D. C. (2011). Vitamin C restores blood pressure and vasodilator response during mental stress in obese children. Arquivos brasileiros de cardiologia, 96(6), 490-497.
5. Carrillo, A. E., Murphy, R. J., & Cheung, S. S. (2008). Vitamin C supplementation and salivary immune function following exercise-heat stress. Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 3(4), 516-530.
6. Nakhostin-Roohi, B., Babaei, P., Rahmani-Nia, F., & Bohlooli, S. (2008). Effect of vitamin C supplementation on lipid peroxidation, muscle damage and inflammation after 30-min exercise at 75% VO^ sub 2max^. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 48(2), 217.
7. Colby, J. A., Chen, W. T., Baker, W. L., Coleman, C. I., Reinhart, K., Kluger, J., & White, C. M. (2011). Effect of ascorbic acid on inflammatory markers after cardiothoracic surgery. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy,68(17).

Magnesium:
1. Cinar, V., Polat, Y., Baltaci, A. K., & Mogulkoc, R. (2011). Effects of magnesium supplementation on testosterone levels of athletes and sedentary subjects at rest and after exhaustion. Biological trace element research, 140(1), 18-23.
2. van der Plas, A. A., Schilder, J. C., Marinus, J., & van Hilten, J. J. (2013). An explanatory study evaluating the muscle relaxant effects of intramuscular magnesium sulphate for dystonia in complex regional pain syndrome. The Journal of Pain, 14(11), 1341-1348.
3. Hatzistavri, L. S., Sarafidis, P. A., Georgianos, P. I., Tziolas, I. M., Aroditis, C. P., Zebekakis, P. E., … & Lasaridis, A. N. (2009). Oral magnesium supplementation reduces ambulatory blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. American journal of hypertension, 22(10), 1070-1075.
4. Golf, S. W., Bender, S., & Grüttner, J. (1998). On the significance of magnesium in extreme physical stress. Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy,12(2), 197-202.
5. Carpenter, T. O., DeLucia, M. C., Zhang, J. H., Bejnerowicz, G., Tartamella, L., Dziura, J., … & Cohen, D. (2006). A randomized controlled study of effects of dietary magnesium oxide supplementation on bone mineral content in healthy girls. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 91(12), 4866-4872.
6. Held, K., Antonijevic, I. A., Künzel, H., Uhr, M., Wetter, T. C., Golly, I. C., … & Murck, H. (2002). Oral Mg (2+) supplementation reverses age-related neuroendocrine and sleep EEG changes in humans. Pharmacopsychiatry,35(4), 135-143.
7. Brilla, L. R., & Haley, T. F. (1992). Effect of magnesium supplementation on strength training in humans. Journal of the American College of Nutrition,11(3), 326-329.

Rhodiola Rosea Root Extract:
1. Hung, S. K., Perry, R., & Ernst, E. (2011). The effectiveness and efficacy of Rhodiola rosea L.: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.Phytomedicine, 18(4), 235-244.
2. Edwards, D., Heufelder, A., & Zimmermann, A. (2012). Therapeutic Effects and Safety of Rhodiola rosea Extract WS® 1375 in Subjects with Life‐stress Symptoms–Results of an Open‐label Study. Phytotherapy Research, 26(8), 1220-1225.
3. Spasov, A. A., Wikman, G. K., Mandrikov, V. B., Mironova, I. A., & Neumoin, V. V. (2000). A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of the stimulating and adaptogenic effect of Rhodiola rosea SHR-5 extract on the fatigue of students caused by stress during an examination period with a repeated low-dose regimen. Phytomedicine, 7(2), 85-89.
4. Shevtsov, V. A., Zholus, B. I., Shervarly, V. I., Vol’skij, V. B., Korovin, Y. P., Khristich, M. P., … & Wikman, G. (2003). A randomized trial of two different doses of a SHR-5 Rhodiola rosea extract versus placebo and control of capacity for mental work. Phytomedicine, 10(2), 95-105.
5. Darbinyan, V., Aslanyan, G., Amroyan, E., Gabrielyan, E., Malmström, C., & Panossian, A. (2007). Clinical trial of Rhodiola rosea L. extract SHR-5 in the treatment of mild to moderate depression. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry,61(5), 343-348.

Holy Basil Extract:
1. Bhattacharyya, D., Sur, T. K., Jana, U., & Debnath, P. K. (2008). Controlled programmed trial of Ocimum sanctum leaf on generalized anxiety disorders.Nepal. Med. Coll. J, 10(3), 176-179.

L-Tyrosine:
1. Benedict, C. R., Anderson, G. H., & Sole, M. J. (1983). The influence of oral tyrosine and tryptophan feeding on plasma catecholamines in man. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 38(3), 429-435.
2. Alonso, R., Gibson, C. J., Wurtman, R. J., Agharanya, J. C., & Prieto, L. (1982). Elevation of urinary catecholamines and their metabolites following tyrosine administration in humans. Biological psychiatry, 17(7), 781-790.
3. Agharanya, J. C., Alonso, R., & Wurtman, R. J. (1981). Changes in catecholamine excretion after short-term tyrosine ingestion in normally fed human subjects. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 34(1), 82-87.
4. Acworth, I. N., During, M. J., & Wurtman, R. J. (1988). Tyrosine: effects on catecholamine release. Brain research bulletin, 21(3), 473-477.
5. Neri, D. F., Wiegmann, D., Stanny, R. R., Shappell, S. A., McCardie, A., & McKay, D. L. (1995). The effects of tyrosine on cognitive performance during extended wakefulness. Aviation, space, and environmental medicine.

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